×
×

Junkyard Nordberg

Author Photo
By Lloyd A. & Barbara D. Dean | Nov 1, 1998

1 / 3
Kato 20 KW generator on 3/71 in Detroit.
2 / 3
Nearly ready to run 1 cyl. Nordberg.
3 / 3
Nordberg as found.

218 South Poplar Arthur, Illinois 61911

My son-in-law told me of a generator sitting among some things
of doubtful value in south central Illinois, about 160 miles south
of my home. A quick conference with a friend and we were on our way
to see it for ourselves.

We found ourselves among some very fine folks and inquired about
the generator. We were told the generator, engine, and another
engine could be had for a price we could live with. Closer
inspection revealed the generator to be a 20 KW 3 phase. Great,
just what I was looking for, 1200 rpm, also. A small amount of math
told me it would be a perfect match for a 3-71 Detroit I had.
Looking at the engine attached to it, I discovered a Nordberg
two-cylinder engine, 20 HP at 1200 rpm. The other engine was a
Nordberg single-cylinder 15 HP at 1800 rpm. Both were diesel. The
two-cylinder was virtually an unused engine, perfect condition,
while the single cylinder was nearly worn out. Nordberg
two-cylinder units have been around my area for many years and are
superb engines, so mine sold readily. I had never seen a
single-cylinder one, but an Amish friend of mine said he once had
one, and gave me the injector pump to put on mine. I located a
book, but it only had 24 three-cylinder units listed. Again, I did
not know a three-cylinder had ever been made. It appears the rods,
pistons, flywheels (400 lb.) were all the same on 1, 2, and 3
cylinder models. I am working on the one-cylinder engine in my
spare time and the generator is now mounted on the 3-71 Detroit.
The one-cylinder, 700 lb. Nordberg diesel will be a nice addition
to my collection and can be put into service at a moment’s
notice, should the need arise. Page 347 of American Gasoline
Engines shows the larger marine Nordbergs, but the one called Power
Chief is not mentioned. I hope to hear from other Nordberg
owners.

Gas Engine Magazine

Preserving the History of Internal Combustion Engines