Field Marshall Tractor

By Staff
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3803 II4A St., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6J IN5

WE have been subscribers to GEM for about two years now, and we
always look forward to each issue. Since we have yet to see any
information on the Field-Marshall tractor, we thought that the
readers might enjoy our story.

We have been collecting tractors and engines since 1972 in
England, and moved to Canada in 1978. We’ve been collecting
over here for nine years. We finally found time to restore three
tractors last summer, and took them to a show at the Central
Alberta Antique & Model Club, at Leslieville, Alberta. It made
us feel proud to see the people take such an interest in the
tractors we restored. Especially the way they bounced while
running.

The tractors that my father and I restored are a 1949 Series 3,
a 1948 Series 2, which are both Field-Marshalls and a 1949 Fowler
Crawler. The Fowler is a track conversion that was made in Leeds,
England – with the engine supplied by the Marshall company of
England. In England the Field-Marshalls are called
‘Pop-Pops’ probably because of a single cylinder diesel
engine that has a bore of 61/2‘ and a
stroke of 9’, which develops 40 H.P. They can be started either
by a 31/2‘ handle or by a power
cartridge. Either process is an easy undertaking.

The Marshall company was in production up till 1986/87, with a
tractor that had a Leyland engine and design, but the tractor
didn’t suit the English market, so they stopped production. The
Fowler, however, is still in production but a different style than
the 1949 model. It is powered by a 6 cylinder Perkins 354.

Each tractor has been completely rebuilt with original Marshall
parts, and are what we consider 100% original, except for the new
paint. These are our favourite tractors in our collection of 13,
and right now we are working on a 1921 petrol, vertical Lister 8
H.P. and a 1936 Marshall 20 H.P. engine. As you probably can see we
like our English equipment!

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