IN MEMORIAM

By Staff
article image

BAYARD G. BERNARD, age 74, of Jamestown, Kentucky, was born
February 3, 1921. He was a World War II veteran and an expert
mechanic. He worked for years as a mechanic, on boats, cars,
tractors, and old engines. He bought several engines for himself,
and restored them. He also helped restore some for his friends. He
enjoyed going to antique tractor and engine shows, and of course he
could answer any question about them that you had.

After B. G. retired from working, he worked for people around
Jamestown, mostly doing favors for them. Everyone knew to call on
him if they had problems. He taught me a lot of things that
I’ll never forget. He was probably the best friend I have ever
had, and also a father figure. He would visit my shop and helped me
work on my dozers, antique tractor, and anything else that needed
to be torn apart and fixed, he could do it. He was happiest when he
was elbow deep in grease or oil. B. G. passed away on February 16,
1995 of a heart attack. He had been reading his antique engine
magazine the day he died.

Life goes on in Jamestown today, but my friend is missing and
being missed by many. He was a good husband, father, grandfather,
and a very great friend!

Handy, as I always called him, I miss you!!

Submitted by a good friend, Willard Carries, 590 South Highway
619, Jamestown, KY 42629.

LA VERNE ‘TOM’ WALGENBACH, 63, a husband, great father,
and good friend to many, passed away suddenly January 8, 1995. Tom
was a retired farmer, if there is such a thing!

Tom was an avid John Deere tractor enthusiast. In fact in 1992
through 1994, he built a half-scale John Deere ‘D’, 1936
unstyled. He modeled it after his full-size 36 ‘D.’ It was
completely built by hand with the exception of the tires and the
hood. In 1994, Tom then built a half-scale John Deere hay rack. He
exhibited both of these at many, many shows. Whenever the
opportunity arose, the trailer was loaded and off to the show. He
always made time to explain to folks how he built each part. And
when running, it sounded like a two-cylinder. There was always time
to talk and visit.

Tom is survived by his wife Carol and children: Carole, Ida,
Tom. He will be missed by many, but I will miss him most, as he was
my Dad. I am a very, very, lucky person to have had him as my
father. The person I am today is credited to my dad. He taught me
many things in life, and in his later years taught me quite a lot
about old tractors and farm equipment. It will be hard attending
the shows this year and knowing Dad’s not here with his little
‘D.’ He touched many lives. And no matter where I go or
what show I’m at I think Dad will be with me in spirit. I love
you, Dad!

Submitted by Carole Walgenbach Wenzel, 336 N. 24th Road,
Oglesby, IL 61348.

CHARLES ‘CHARLIE’ L. BRISTOL, 84, of Somers,
Connecticut, passed away January 22, 1995. Born in Petersbourg, New
Hampshire, he had lived in Somers for the past forty years. He was
a self-employed piano tuner in the Connecticut and Massachusetts
area for the past thirty-five years. He was the organist at the
Somers Baptist Church. He was a member of the Scan-tic Valley
Antique Engine Club. He leaves his wife, Emma (Melbourne) Bristol;
his mother, Nina Bristol, of Long Lake, New York; two brothers,
Wayne of East Hartford, Connecticut and Carlton J. of New
Jersey.

Charlie was well-liked by engine people especially fellow
members of the Scantic Valley Antique Engine Club. Charlie and his
wife, Emma, were voted outstanding club members for the year.
Charlie could be counted on to help anyone who needed advice about
getting an engine running, machining parts, charging magnetos, etc.
Charlie also took pleasure in building gas and steam engine models.
He built his own tractor from ‘scratch.’ It was unique.
Anyone who attended the Hampden shows the years that Charlie hauled
it there, would remember it. Many SVAEC meetings were held at
Charlie and Emma’s as they offered the use of the shop for
monthly club meetings whenever we needed a place to meet.

Charlie is sadly missed by his fellow members and friends. But
knowing Charlie, he is helping others in ‘engine
heaven.’

Submitted by Frank Carey, Scantic Valley Antique Engine Club, 95
Wilbraham Road, Monson, MA 01057.

WILLIAM ‘BILLY’ CARMINE of R. D. 2, Box 225A, Laurel,
Delaware 19956, passed away on December 4, 1994. He had just
finished harvesting his bean crop. Billy will be remembered by a
lot of people for a lot of different things, but the ‘wiener
race’ will bring a smile to all who participated. Billy got the
idea for the First Harvest Celebration, four years ago at
St.Paul’s Church. The participants must catch a baby pig, and
tie a bonnet on its head. Then holding the pig, they must drive a
tractor through an obstacle course. After completing the run
competitors must de-bonnet the pig and place it in a pen. The
person with the best time won. This race was as much fun to
participate in as to watch. Billy also worked to ensure that
tractor restorers would have an authentic antique gauge. With the
help and support of his wife of 34 years, Joyce, they were the
proud owners of Antique Gauges, Inc., and had contracts with John
Deere, Case, Minneapolis Moline, and Oliver. His wife Joyce will
carry on the business. Billy will be missed by all who he called
his friends, who include fellow vintage gas engine and tractor
enthusiasts throughout the United States and Canada, Europe and New
Zealand.

Submitted by fellow collectors Mike and Lonanne Lucius, 2584
South Dexter Street, Denver, CO 80222.

SAM POCK died Saturday February 4, 1995, at his home in
Zionsville, Indiana. He was 18.

He was born to Eugene Pock Jr. and Sandy Spoor Pock in
Indianapolis, Indiana, on September 2, 1976. Both parents
survive.

A senior at Zionsville Community High School, he was named the
most valuable player for the special teams unit of the Varsity
Football Team in 1994. He was a member of the Traders Point Church
of Christ and the Western Minnesota Steam Threshers. His hobby was
restoring Ford Mustangs. Sam spent his summers assisting with his
father’s antique tractor collection at various shows in the
Midwest including: Illiana Antique Power Association, Boswell,
Indiana; INI Antique Tractor and Gas Engine Club, Pennfield,
Illinois; Darke County Steam Threshers Association, Greenfield,
Ohio; Pioneer Engineers Club, Rushville, Indiana; Mid-America
Threshing and Antiques Inc., Tipton, Indiana; Tri-State Gas Engines
and Tractor Assn., Portland, Indiana; Western Minnesota Steam
Threshers, Rollag, Minnesota. Survivors in addition to his parents
include four sisters, a brother, paternal grandfather, and maternal
grandmother.

Submitted by Jeanann M. Pock, 6350 S. 700 East, Zionsville, IN
46077.

Gas Engine Magazine
Gas Engine Magazine
Preserving the History of Internal Combustion Engines