IN MEMORIAM

By Staff
article image

ROBERT E. (Bob) HARPER, 70, of Gun Lake, Shelbyville, Michigan
passed away on July 20, 1991 after several years battle with
cancer.

Survivors are his wife, Darlene, whom he married in 1963, a son,
John and grandson, of Asheville, NC.

Bob collected antique cars in earlier years, but his interest
switched to gas engines and for many years, regularly attended swap
meets and shows all over Michigan as well as Indiana, Illinois,
Iowa, and Florida. He belonged to numerous engine clubs over the
years, and the shows at Portland, Indiana, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa and
Zolfo Springs, Florida, were the three biggest annual events in his
life. He enjoyed helping friends restore engines as well as
restoring engines for himself. He loved GEM and kept all of his
issues going back to 1966, which he would read and reread.

Bob was an electrician, a car salesman, and retired in 1983 as
superintendent of purchasing and maintenance for Gun Lake Area
Sewer Authority. He was always active in local politics, having
served as Township Supervisor, and on the township Board of Review.
He was Orangeville Township deputy clerk at the time of his
death.

He will be sadly missed by his family and many friends.

Submitted by his wife, Darlene Harper, 11031 Wildwood Rd.,
Shelbyville, Michigan 49344.

MENNO TASKEE, age 71, passed away at his home on September 14,
1991.

A lifelong resident of the Homer area, Menno was a tool and die
maker, who retired in 1981.

He was an avid collector of antique gas engines and hand tools,
did his own repairs and made parts. Among his collection were
several model gas engines he built after he retired.

He, his wife, and their daughter, Debbie, traveled to many gas
engine shows around Southern Michigan, showing his collection and
gathering a great wealth of friends. (We will miss you all.)

He is survived by his wife, Ada, son, Douglas, three daughters,
Charlene Steirle, Pamela Miller and Debbie Byrd, and seven
grandchildren.

Submitted by Ada Taskee and family, 814 South Sophia, Homer,
Michigan 49245.

On May 23, 1991 I lost not only a ‘steam engine’ buddy,
but a very good friend. JULIUS W. WOODS, 79 years old, passed away
at Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Julius was born in Raymilton, Pa., and graduated from Wesley
High School. He was employed at Wolfs Head Oil Company for 35
years, retiring in 1972.

Although he retired from work, he never retired from his beloved
antique shows. Every time an antique show or engine show was
scheduled, he packed up and was an active part of the show.

He was unique in his smile and he never found fault with anyone.
He was eulogized by his daughter, Fran, as the ‘most gentle,
kind and personal in giving of himself to everyone’.

Julius had a special way to live and love life. Worn-out tires,
only driving from gas station to gas station (sometimes barely
making it); he hardly ever sold anything.

In 1958 Julius started the Keystone Chapter of the Penn-Ohio
‘A’ Ford Club along with Bryan Carson and Bob Woods. He was
its first member. He was also a member of Pennsylvania Oil Region
Club, Pioneer Steam and Gas Engine Society, Ashtabula Oil Engine
Group, the RSVP Happy Notes where he played a guitar and harmonica,
Pioneer Steam and Gas Society, and the Cool spring Engine
Group.

After funeral well-attended by family and many friends, Julius
was honored by a wonderful tribute. The family rode in his own
personal antique cars while 50 others formed an escort from Oil
City to Mount Irvine Cemetery at Wesley, Pa., where he was laid to
rest. This procession consisted of fourteen Model
‘A’s’, Julius’ special love.

Julius is survived by three sons, Gerald, Donald, and Richard
and two daughters, Ruby and Fran, nine grandchildren and one great
grandchild, three brothers, Frank, Reid and Graydon, along with his
beloved friend, Eleanor Morchenke.

I will miss Julius, his smile, laughter and seemingly endless
knowledge.

Submitted by Paul Wright, Jr., 967 County Line Rd.,
Greenville, PA 16125

Gas Engine Magazine
Gas Engine Magazine
Preserving the History of Internal Combustion Engines