In Memorian

By Staff

Verle Johnson, 78, of Marseilles, Ill., died
Nov. 25, 2004, at Riverside Nursing Home after a short stay.

Verle was born Aug. 15, 1926, in Miller Township, Ill. He
married June Wicks May 29, 1948, in Seneca, Ill., and farmed his
entire life. He served on the Miller Township Board and was
Township clerk for 24 years. Verle was a member of the Stavanger
Lutheran Church, the IHC Collectors Club, the LaSalle County Farm
Bureau, the Civil Defense and the Sandwich Early Day Engine Club,
where he served as president, vice president and
secretary/treasurer over the years.

His wife, two sons, two daughters and 11 grandchildren survive
him.

While Verle enjoyed going to shows and exhibiting his equipment,
most of what he took was the equipment he used on the farm. They
weren’t really antiques to him, but a way of life that he liked to
show other people.

Verle was always willing to help out with whatever project
needed done and still found time to restore some exceptional
equipment. Verle’s passing has left us with some very large shoes
to fill. 73.

Submitted by Ray Forrer, Sandwich Early Day Engine Club,
Somonauk, Ill.

Charles “Charlie” Schilkofski, a long-time
flywheel gas engine enthusiast, died Feb. 4, 2005, at the age of
83. He was a lifelong farmer in Hudson, Ill. Charlie was also a
lifelong collector of all sorts of antiques, tack for horses and
fire trucks. He loved woodworking and built one of the best
collections of antique flywheel gas engines.

For the last 20 years plus, you could always find him attending
at least 25 antique gas engine shows in Illinois a year, proudly
showing off engines with engine trucks and wooden wagons he had
built. At one time, his engine collection numbered over 100.

His wife, Helen, a daughter Jeanette and two sons, Michael and
Paul, survive him. He made many friends at the shows. He really
missed seeing his friends and going to the shows last year due to
his health.

Submitted by Michael Schilkofski, Bloomington, Ill.

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