How Your Hobby Started Part XXIII

By Staff
1 / 18
2 / 18
Courtesy of Robert Herren, Route I, Box 354,Winlock,Washington 98596.
3 / 18
Courtesy of John Cullity, Route 6-A, East Sandwich, Massachusetts 02537.
4 / 18
Courtesy of John Cullity, Route 6-A, East Sandwich, Massachusetts 02537.
5 / 18
This photo shows my son-in-law and grandson, Cliff and Duane La Frenz and I with my trailer load of gas engines and Maytag motors at one of the many shows we attend.
6 / 18
7 / 18
Courtesy of Ernest Hoff, 235 W. Franklin Avenue, Barron, Wisconsin 54812.
8 / 18
Courtesy of Ernest Hoff, 235 W. Franklin Avenue, Barron, Wisconsin 54812.
9 / 18
Courtesy of Bernard Race, 1322 Christine Place, Peoria, Illinois 61614.
10 / 18
Courtesy of Don Selmer, 811 Gary Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53716.
11 / 18
Courtesy of Walter C. Bieritz, Route 2, Box 168, Yorkville, Illinois 60560.
12 / 18
35-70 Minnesota & 28-50 Hart Parr. Courtesy of A. C. Pump, Grant, Nebraska 69140.
13 / 18
Courtesy of Morris Blomgren, Route 1, Siren, Wisconsin 54872.
14 / 18
These are my engines-3 HP F. & M., Independent & I. H. C. Courtesy of A. C. Pump, Grant, Nebraska 69140.
15 / 18
My Oil Pull as displayed at the Fest in Lindsborg. Courtesy of Leonard hogback, Lindsborg, Kansas 67456.
16 / 18
Courtesy of Fred W. Parker, Blackfoot, Alberta T0B-0L0, Canada.
17 / 18
Picture is a Doak engine, 400 rpm, made in Oakland, California, No. CA1045. Standard Oil Plant in Winlock back in 20s-old gasoline engine was used to unload the tank cars on the railroad and pump the gas and oil into their storage tanks.
18 / 18
Melvin's outfit--picture taken in 1930. Courtesy of Melvin Huether, 1188 Ottawa Street, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

3904-47th Avenue, S., Seattle, Washington 98118

Early this year, it seemed as though these articles would be
concluded because much of the research already completed had been
used in these reports, but now there are many additional makes of
engines to describe.

With each successive issue there comes to the writer additional
gasoline engine catalogs and data from G. E. M. readers, all of
which is appreciated. As literature on these different makes of
engines continue to come to our attention, it seems strange there
should be so many. However, it is quite to the contrary as it would
take years to locate and report on some five hundred engine
manufacturers that were in existence in the era of 1905 to
1920.

It may seem a bit repetitious at times that the specifications
for each engine under discussion should be so similar to all the
other makes. This is the case because so many stationary engines
were very much alike and were competitive in many respects.

It is hoped that these articles will contain pertinent
information for collectors to assist them in identifying and
rebuilding the many makes in a refurbished condition equal to the
original.

When starting to recondition an old engine it is quite likely
that one of the first questions to come to the mechanics mind is
whether the ignition system will still function.

Melvin Eaves of 1427 Wessynton Road, N. E. at Atlanta, Georgia
30306 has a good ignition testing system for battery operated make
and break ignition that should be helpful. The diagram pictured
will give a good idea of the simple method of testing as it
requires only a small 6 volt lamp.

MAKE AND BREAK  BATTERY IGNITION TESTER CIRCUIT

1. When points are open bulb will light.

2. When points are closed bulb will not light

3. When igniter is working properly bulb will flash on and off
as engine runs.

4. If points are dirty or are not making a circuit for other
reasons bulb will burn constantly.

5. If points are stuck together by carbon or won’t open bulb
will not light.

The Hamilton Gasoline Engine was a product of the Advance
Manufacturing Co. of Hamilton, Ohio according to catalogs of this
company from the Broken Kettle Book Service. Another catalog on the
same engine came from Roger Kriebel of Mainland, Pennsylvania. This
catalog was dated 1898 and illustrated Models No. 1 to No. 30 and
the engines built with ratings from 4 to 35 HP in a horizontal
heavy duty type of construction.

These Hamilton gasoline engines were four cycle, single cylinder
which were overhung back of the heavy cast iron base. This detail
of design was to afford ample expansion and contraction of the
cylinder when the unit was carrying a full load and the closed
cylinder water jacket was at a high temperature. The cylinder was
bolted to the crankcase by a flange around the open end. The cast
iron sub-base extended back under the overhung cylinder.

A rather simple design was employed having a lay shaft alongside
the base geared from the crankshaft. A plunger type fuel pump was
located on the side of the engine and operated by a cam on the lay
shaft. This pump carried fuel from an underground storage tank to
the mixing valve with an overflow return pipe.

Another cam operated the mechanical exhaust valve which was
located underneath the cylinder and operated by a rocker arm. The
intake valve was automatic and located under the cylinder. From a
cam at the end of the lay shaft the igniter is released by a pin on
the operating lever.

The main bearings were set at an angle towards the cylinder to
overcome some of the forward thrust, and there was a reinforcing
rib cast alongside the crankcase to the top of the main bearings to
add strength to the crankcase. Crankshafts were forged from
open-hearth steel and were turned and finished to accept a flywheel
on each side of the machine.

The governor is a fly ball type located near the cylinder head
and was gear driven from the lay shaft. Being of the throttling
governor type, it controlled the admission of the fuel and air from
the mixing valve which consisted of a needle valve to control the
gasoline and air shutter. The fuel pump completed this system for
an underground tank and 74° gasoline was recommended which was a
product of the Standard Oil Company.

The closed water jacket on these engines required a cooling tank
so located that a thermo syphon circulating water system could be
used for cooling the engine.

Hamilton engine ratings were given by two methods. One gave the
engines by numbers, such as No. 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 25,
30 and 35. Then another specification table gave the following
details:

CHART A

HP

RPM

FLOOR SPACE INCHES

WEIGHT

4

300

36 x 46

1100

6

250

44 x 69

2000

8

250

44 x 69

2100

10

225

56 x 85

3000

12

225

56 x 85

3200

15

225

61 x 93

4500

20

200

61 x 93

4800

25

200

61 x 109

7000

30

200

63 x 112

7300

35

200

63 x 112

8000

Frequently, it is desired to compare the size of engines by
their cubic inch contents of the cylinder, and also to use such
figures in the calculation of the HP of an engine. The following
table gives ready reference of the capacity of a cylinder by the
bore and stroke in inches:

CHART B

BORE-STROKE

CUBIC INCHES

2? – 3?

21

3-3

21

3-3?

25

3-4

28

3-4?

32

3? – 3?

34

3? – 4?

43

3? – 4?

50

3? – 5

55

4-4

50

4-4?

57

4-4?

53

4? – 4?

72

4?-5

80

4?-6

95

5-5?

108

5-6

118

5 3/8-6

136

5-6?

128

5?-6

143

5? – 6?

154

5?-7

166

6-6

170

6-6?

184

6-7

198

6-8

226

6 3/8-8

255

6?-7

232

6? – 8?

282

7-8

308

7-9

346

7-10

385

7? – 8

353

7? – 9

398

7? -10

441

8-9

452

8-10

503

Another nice piece of engine literature from the library of
Roger Kriebel is the No. 20 Catalog of The Eagle Manufacturing Co.
of Appleton, Wisconsin, which was dated 1908.

This company built feed and ensilage cutters, feed grinders,
sawing rigs, sweep horse powers and gasoline engines. This catalog
was published at the time their new factory buildings were
completed which consisted of a foundry 40 x 150 feet, wood working
plant 40 x 72 feet, a machine shop 40 x 230 feet and a warehouse
160 x 130 feet. All of the power for these shops was furnished by
Eagle Gasoline Engines.

The horsepower sweeps soon gave way to the more modern gasoline
engines, while their volume of business increased in the feed and
ensilage cutter and feed grinders departments.

A range of ratings for their gasoline engines were 1?, 3, 5, 7,
9, 12, 14, 16 and 20 HP. In the days when cast iron was cheap,
these companies could make money by manufacturing many sizes.
However, the gasoline engine manufacturers who stayed in business
over the years produced fewer sizes of engines. Their ratings
offered a full coverage of the power requirements because of the
overload capacity of their engines and lower prices. For instance,
a customer required four to five horsepower, which was too big a
load for 3 HP, could use a 6 HP as long as the cost of the engine
was competitive to a 4 or 5 HP rating in other makes. The standard
size for many manufacturers were 1?, 3, 6, 10, 15 and 20 HP.

The smaller size Eagle engines were built with a cast iron base
and open crankcase in one piece casting. The cylinder was bolted to
the crankcase by a round flange at the open end. These engines were
horizontal with closed water jacket cylinders and hopper-cooled
types could be supplied. They were four cycle hit and miss fly ball
governor, which operated from the side shaft through bevel
gears.

The Eagle engines differed from the usual design in that the
side shaft was located on the right side of the frame when facing
the flywheels. This shaft was driven by spiral gears off the
crankshaft with bearings at the driven end and another at the head.
An early and late spark control lever for starting and another
lever under the cylinder reduced the compression for safe and easy
starting. The governor linkage under the cylinder held closed the
intake valve on the idle stroke.

The regular ignition system consisted of batteries, coil and
either a spark plug or an igniter could be furnished. A gear type
rotary pump was used for cooling water circulation when a cooling
tank was used.

Crankshafts were open-hearth steel billets, which were sawed to
shape and turned to size. Connecting rods had bearing box ends and
with two bolts. Pistons had four piston rings.

Portable units on trucks with iron wheels were made in sizes of
5, 7, 9, 12, 14, 16 and 20 HP. Cord wood saw rigs were assembled in
several sizes, which used cooling tanks and were on horse-drawn
trucks.

Specifications covering the Eagle gasoline engines are as
follows:

CHART C

HP

BORE & STROKE INCHES

DIAMETER INCHES

FLYWHEEL DIA.-IN.

RPM

WEIGHT

1?

4 x 4

1?

20

475

250

2

4 x 5

1 3/8

20

475

395

3

5 x 6

1?

28

400

800

55

6 x 8

2

35

350

1400

7

6? x 9

2 1/8

41

325

1850

9

7? x 10

2 3/8

44

300

2300

12

8 x 11?

2?

47

280

2650

14

8? x 12

2?

49

270

3100

16

9? x 13

3

52

260

3850

20

10 x 15

3?

55

250

5300

The Pattin Bros. Company of Marietta, Ohio was established
October 24, 1879 and according to the catalog from Broken Kettle
Book Service, this company was incorporated on December 31,
1901.

Our Emerson Brantingham plow outfit, 12-20 tractor and three
bottom plow in 1919.

With limited information on their products they began
manufacturing a general line of products and added various types of
implements before building gasoline engines.

The Pattin gasoline engine was a single cylinder, horizontal
water-cooled with a hopper on the smaller ratings of 2? and 4? HP.
Double flywheels on the crankshaft extension, and open crankcase
carried the journals which were babbitt-lined. A hit and miss type
of governor was used and the side rod operated the mechanical
exhaust valve, while the intake valve was automatic spring
loaded.

Larger units were of single cylinder horizontal construction
with the cylinder bolted to the crankcase by a flange around the
open end. These units had a fly ball governor and a side rod that
was fitted to the side of cylinder head. The mechanical exhaust
valve was operated by the side rod while the intake valve was
automatic.

Battery and coil ignition was the standard practice using a
hammer type igniter. Magneto could be supplied on special order. A
hit and miss governor was used.

Mechanical lubricators were used on the larger ratings and some
units were arranged with both mechanical intake and exhaust
valves.

As can be seen on page 12 of the November-December 1970 issue of
G. E. M. there is a picture of a 25 HP Pattin engine. These larger
sizes were manufactured in ratings of 8, 12, 15, 20, 25, 32,40, 50,
60, 75 and 90 HP. Mention was made of a two cycle model being
available in 15, 20 and 25 HP sizes, which were reversible.

A number of combination units were assembled with Pattin engines
including air compressors, piston type simplex pumps, high pressure
power pumps and vacuum pumps were offered. A large deep well
walking beam outfit for installation over the well was made for
various depth installations.

Engine specifications were not shown in this catalog for any of
the ratings, and there was no indication of the color used for the
finish.

Another little known engine comes to our attention by a bulletin
from Phil King of Granville, Massachusetts. This is the Homer
Gasoline Engine Company of Homer, Michigan who according to this
pamphlet made a 2? HP vertical, single cylinder, four cycle
enclosed crankcase, water-cooled unit with a rather unique
construction of their own design.

The enclosed crankcase housed the timing gears, and the timing
shaft extended out of the crankcase with the vertical valve lifter.
The valve push rod operated the exhaust valve while the intake was
automatic. Splash lubrication took care of the crank and main
bearings and the gears. Two flywheels were used.

The cast iron sub-base housed the gasoline tank, with the
carburetor located near the tank with a long intake pipe extending
up to the suction valve in the water-cooled head. The cylinder was
turned inside and out and flange mounted to the top of the
crankcase. A seamless brass tube was installed on the outside of
the cylinder with gaskets top and bottom forming the water jacket.
This tube was held in place by the water-cooled cylinder head. A
thermosyphon cooling system was used with a water tank. Battery
ignition with a high tension coil and spark plug was used.

The engine rated at 2? HP, had a bore of 4 inches and stroke of
6 inches and the flywheels were 20 inches in diameter. It
apparently was very liberally rated. The crankshaft diameter was 1
3/8 inches at the main bearings and the wrist pin was ? inch
diameter by 2 1/8 inches long. Connecting rod bearing was 1? by 2
inches. Valves were 1? inches intake and 1? inches exhaust and 3/8
inch stem. Gas tank capacity was 1? gallons and oil capacity 3
pints. The engine operated at 450 rpm and weighed 415 pounds.

To mention one more rare make of engines on which there are no
specifications, not even the ratings in which they were built, was
a product of The Middle-ton Machine Works of Middleton, Ohio from a
pamphlet from Broken Kettle Book Service. This engine had a trade
name of ‘Miami’.

It was a large engine according to the picture, being built on a
heavy base similar to a steam engine. It was made in a horizontal
single closed water jacketed cylinder and substantially bolted to
the heavy cast iron base and crank-case. A side shaft driven by
gears off the crankshaft carried the cams for operating the valves,
with the end of the shaft having the flyball governor assembly
mounted in a horizontal position. The governor was of the hit and
miss type. A cam operated the hammer type igniter. It was located
in the head. Battery and coil ignition were used, as the company
did not recommend the use of hot tube ignition.

Picture taken in 1915 at Kinsington, Minnesota. Outfit belonged
to Erick Stafuson. I would like to know if any of the fellows still
live and what happened to the Big Four Tractor. The fellow who has
his hand up to his hat is George Cumeline, from four miles west of
Fredric, is still living there. The little fellow in front of the
milk can must still be around.

The cylinder water jacket was open from end to end, with a
flange to cover the chamber. The cylinder head was cored to fit the
water jacket at that end and completed the circulation from the
cylinder thought he head and return to the hot water outlet.

Crankshaft was turned from a solid forging and operated in large
main bearings set at 45° toward the cylinder to compensate forward
thrust. Flywheels were heavy and a safety cover was placed over the
shaft extension. An outboard bearing on the pulley side maintained
shaft extension alignment on that side of the unit.

G. E. M. Readers having further details on this Miami engine
would be welcome to send specifications in order that detailed
report could be given in a future installment.

In the last issue, mention was made of Sieverkropp Engine, owned
by George S. Clark. This very unusual engine design prompted Donald
Swastone, J: of Dearborn, Missouri to send additional data on these
small engines, which we are glad to pass on to our readers.

These engines were built in vertical enclosed crankcase, in-line
one and two cylinder machines. They were two cycle, two port and
the two cylinder engines have two pistons on one connecting rod.
There is a passage from one cylinder to the other at the top. As
the suction port opens, it takes air and fuel from the mixing valve
into the crankcase, then through the passage to the combustion
chamber. Both cylinders fire simultaneously.

These engines were patented on December 20, 1900, and were built
by the company at Racine, Wisconsin. They manufactured four
different styles, such as a 1? HP tank cooled, 1? HP open type with
cast on water hopper, 1 HP washing machine special and a little ?
HP single cylinder engine.

Specifications of Siverkropp Engines:

CHART D

?HP

1 HP

1% HP

No. of cylinders

1

2

2

Bore

2′

2′

2′

Stroke

2′

2′

2′

Diameter of crankshaft

?’

7/8′

7/8′

R. P. M.

1000

650

900

Size of pulley

2′ x 1?’

2′ x 2?’

2′ x 2?’

3′ x 2?’

3′ x 2?’

Diameter of flywheel

8?’

10′

10′

Length overall

15′

15′

16′

Width overall

9′

10′

14′

Height overall

12′

23′

26′

Net weight

45 lbs.

105 lbs.

135 lbs.

This company built starters for Ford cars, and pump jacks for
deep wells.

Another year has slipped by and the Holiday Season is at hand.
Many new friends were made in this enjoyable hobby of writing the
history of thirty additional makes of gasoline engines during the
year.

I want to wish my many pen pals and those who are able to visit
with us and all of our readers, the Season’s Greetings and Best
Wishes for a Happy and Peaceful New Year.

A shot of a small threshing outfit that I owned. The picture was
taken in 1942. It is a Case 20 x 28 separator and a John Deere BR
Tractor.

Picture is a Doak engine, 400 rpm, made in
Oakland, California, No. CA1045. Standard Oil Plant in Winlock back
in 20s-old gasoline engine was used to unload the tank cars on the
railroad and pump the gas and oil into their storage tanks.

Picture shows an Old engine, no  name plate about 4 HP. Has
a removable cylinder head with ground joint. Gasoline is supplied
to carburetor by eccentric driven fuel pump on right side. Ignition
is supplied by buzz col and spark plug in center of head.

I would welcome any information as to model and age of the 
Olds engine and the age of the Doak engine.

I would welcome any information as to model and age of the Olds
engine and the age of the Doak engine. Courtesy of Robert Herren,
Route I, Box 354, Winlock, Washington 98596.

Lester Edwards of Dennisport, Massachusetts peering through the
spokes of his 10 HP Springfield. Installed over 60 years ago, this
engine was used to flood cranberry bogs–a common use for large
one-lungers years ago on Cape Cod.

This photo shows my son-in-law and grandson,
Cliff and Duane La Frenz and I with my trailer load of gas engines
and Maytag motors at one of the many shows we attend.

This 5 HP air-cooled Root and Vandervoort was restored by my
brother, Dan Cullity. He uses it to run a drill press, an air
compressor and to saw wood (by running the belt through the wall of
the shop).

Photo taken at Appreciation Day at Barron, Wisconsin in June
1971. My brother, Harry, and I showed several engines: a 15 HP
Fairbanks-Morse, 6 HP I. H. C. Titan 1906 engine. Eclipse F. M.
Pump Engine, a Fuller Johnsons 1912 Pump Engine, Sandwich Pine Tree
Milker Pump Engine and 1? HP Rock Island, all running.

Picture is my brother, Harry Hoff, getting ready to start his 15
HP screen-cooled Fairbanks-Morse Engine. It is in very good
condition and used to run silo filler in the late 1920s.

I just lost my brother, Harry. He passed away June 29, 1972. He
was the one who got me interested in collecting old engines and I
have our 100 engines, all in running condition–a hobby I enjoy
very much.

My Detroit engine, 1911. Taken at Mount Pleasant, Iowa in 1971.
I have Owner’s Manual that came with Detroit, all colored
pictures.

This is our latest find–an 8 HP Fairbanks-Morse hit and miss.
Last patent date October 15, 1901. Serial Number 66990.

My Dad and I would appreciate any information on the cooling
system of this engine.

Gas Engine Magazine
Gas Engine Magazine
Preserving the History of Internal Combustion Engines