Hercules Engine News

By Staff
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The half-breed project as it looks now, almost done.

The 7 HP Hercules screen cooled engine replica project is
nearing completion, and to prove it we have a picture of the
project as it looks now with but a little pin-striping yet to be
done.

But, as with many projects of this type, the real moment of
truth arrives when it comes time to add up all the costs incurred
in the process. Some of you have probably wondered just how much it
has cost to get this far, so this month I’ve pulled together a
ledger of expenses so far.

As with probably most projects of this kind, there seems to
always be more involved than originally expected, and this time is
no exception. The table at right gives a breakdown on expenses.

Not included in the table is any allowance for my own travel,
shop use, on-hand supplies or labor. The cost of an original 7 HP
half-base screen-cooled Economy engine from Sears & Roebuck (on
a straight cart with igniter and battery and coil ignition) in 1915
was $159 plus shipping.

In addition to local suppliers of goods and services, a lot of
the gas engine hobby suppliers were also needed, including
Starbolt, Hit & Miss, Calvin Brookover, John Wanat, The Hobby
Shop (castings), Ken Meeks, and Otto Gas Engine Works.

Half-Breed Project Expenses to Date:

7 HP half-base hopper-cooled engine

$600

Redi Strip (paint and rust removal)

85

Cart iron, wheels and axles

162

Igniter

125

Screen cooler

175

Fuel tank and spout

83

Castings for water jacket

160

Muffler

60

Cost to bore and sleeve cylinder

350

Pulley

50

Piston rings and spacers

51

Miscellaneous supplies

122

Correct oiler

35

Less extra parts sold or saleable

-150

Total Expenditures

$1,890

Even though the engine was operable as it was, it was decided to
repair the cylinder and piston because both were quite worn. A
special bump has been added to the cam to make it possible to start
the engine by the back-kick method. Although this will affect the
exhaust valve timing somewhat, it will still operate quite well as
a loafing show engine.

Glenn Karch is a noted authority on Hercules engines.
Contact him at: 20601 Old State Rd.. Haubstadt, IN 47639, or e-mail
at: glenn.karch@gte.net

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