Gas Engine Survey Results

By Staff

In response to a reader request from Bill Honey last year, we
ran an informal survey of gas engine owners (see GEM April 1993, P.
38), to glean some information on the relative rarity of different
types of gas engines. For those of you who may not remember the
survey, we requested make, model, type of cooling, fuel, and
ignition for each engine, and region where the collector was
located. We took in information on over 2,000 engines from nearly
200 individual collectors. Much of what we found will be no
surprise to the experienced collector.

The first thing we learned was that our form was really flawed.
We had no specific place to put ‘horsepower,’ so that ended
up in the ‘model’ slot or the ‘comments’ place.
And, ‘model’ of course, meant different things to different
people: for some it was the letter designation( like Z, or N); for
some, the name or orientation (like ‘phantom four’ or
‘vertical’) and for others, the horsepower. This meant that
our information is not always comparable, but we are able to
discern a few rather interesting facts from this experiment.

Please keep in mind that we have made no attempt to combine
groups by manufacturer or distributor we merely list the
‘make’ as it was filled out by the individual who sent in
the form. Thus, engines listed as ‘International’ are not
combined with those called ‘McCormick Deering,’ and
‘Economy’ is limited to engines listed as ‘Economy’
regardless of manufacturer, etc. Also, numerous engines were listed
as ‘Bull Dog’ or ‘Little Jumbo,’ without reference
to manufacturer. A few engines are of foreign manufacturer, and
spelling may have been misinterpreted!

The eleven most numerous makes among collectors overall: (50 or
more)

Associated
Briggs & Stratton
Cushman
Economy
Fairbanks Morse
Fuller & Johnson
International
John Deere
Maytag
Stover
Witte

The next category of makes would be engines which were mentioned
more than 10 times, but fewer than 50:

Alamo

Alpha-Delaval

Delco

Domestic

Eclipse

Empire

Fairbanks

Fairmont

Galloway

Gilson

Gray

Hercules

Ideal

Jaeger

Lauson

Majestic
McCormick Deering
Nelson Brothers
New Way
Novo
Ottawa
Root & Vandervoort
Sandwich
Sattley
United
Waterloo Boy

The next category of makes would be engines which we might
consider as ‘medium rare,’ those for which there was more
than one record, but fewer than 10:

Abenaque

Acadia

Altman

Appleton

Arco

Atlas King Bee

Badger

Baker

Bates & Edmonds

John Bean

Bessemer

Bluffton

Brownwall

Bull Dog

Caldwell-Hollowell

Challenge

Chicago

Clinton

Cunningham

Dempster

Detroit

T. EatonEdwards

Elgin

Ellis

Emerson Brantingham

Evinrude

Excelsior

Famous

Farm Master

Faultless

Ferro

Foos

Friend

Gade

Genco

Globe

Ingeco

Jacobson

Johnson

Keller

Kermath

Kewanee

Kohler

Lansing

Leader

LeRoi

Lister

Little Jumbo
London MacLeod
Magnet Manitoba
Massey Harris Maximotor
Maynard Meco Mogul
Michigan Marine Monarch
Monitor Myrick
National New Holland
New Idea Neward
Olds Olin
Onan Perkins
Petter Power Products
Rawleigh Schryer Reeves
Reid Reo
Rock Island Rockford
Ruston Hornsby Sallie Saw

Samsco

Samson
Sandow Schmidt
Sheffield Sparta
Sta Rite Standard
Stewart Stickney
Superior Taylor
Termaat & Monahan Thermoil
Thomas Titan
Union Giant Van Duzen
Vaughn Villiers
West Coast White
Wisconsin Wolverine
Wonder

In what we might call the very rare category, we found the
following ‘makes’, those which were listed only one time.
You’ll recognize that some of these engines are definitely not
rare, they just were not reported much because, for example, they
might be tractor engines, or might be more typically known by a
different name.

Affiliated Kreuger/Atlas
Allman Kit Lalley Light Plant
Always Ready Lindsay-Alamo
Aplco Little Major
Arthur Colton Lockwood Ash
Atlantic Lundy
Atlas Scraper Co. Mainwarings & Havens
Banner Marstal
Beeman Mayhew Light Plant
Bendix Metz & Weiss
Bicknell Moody
Bohon Moteur Aster
Brenner Moteur Moes
Buckeye Moteur Moes
Busy Bee Moteur Vander Common
Campbell Iron Works Motogo Marine
Case Muncie
Casey Jones Napoleon
Challenge Lil Dandy Oil City
Chicago Flexible Shaft Oil Well Supply
Christensen Old War Horse
Clark Ontario Wind Engine
Clark & Norton Ordway
Clarke Orr &. Sembower
Collis Oshkosh
Columbus Machine Co. Otto
Conner Panzer Tractor
Continental Paradox
Cook Parlin & Orendorff
Cooper-Bessemer Pattin Bros.
Cummins Pioneer
David Bradley Plunket
Deyo Powerm aster
Desjardins Racine-Sattley
Dieter Foundry

Red Star

Dixie Renfrew
Dunbar Robertsonville
Dunn Rumely
Duplex S.S.S.
Duro Secord & Orr
Easthope Marine Sieverkropp
Ecco Shaw Tractor
Elmira Leader Sheldon
Elto Simplicity
Enco Light Smith
Ericsson Hot Air Spence H M
A. B. Farquhar St. Albans
Fairfield St. Lawrence
Frost King Jr.

St. Marys

Garland St. Paul
Geiser Sun Power
Goold Shapley Muir Timmer
Gray Marine Turner Mfg. Co.
Gray-Aldrich United States
Great Waterloo Unito
Jacob Haisch Vendenure
Hardie Victor
Havana

Victoria

Hoag Vim Motor Co.
Holland Walter Dunn Motor
Holt Light Plant Works
Hummer Works
Independent Weber
Iron Horse Engine Wells
Isami Wettlaufer
J. J. Raway Williams Machine Co.
J.L.O Wetson
John Lauson Winpower Gonsot
John Smyth Wiscona Pep
Joy Wizard
Kelly Hot Ball Wonder Marine
Woodpecker

We asked respondents to include their region so that we could
see whether there were regional patterns other than those one might
expect. Unfortunately, the total response was not sufficient to
establish any true regional trends. It’s safe to say that
engines that were not widely produced often found most of their
customers fairly close to home.

With regard to the relative rarity of engines by cooling system,
and ignition, here is what we found:

Nearly half the engines were hopper cooled, about 10% air cooled
and 10% tank cooled. We received no cooling data for 387 replies;
only 29 were screen cooled. Gasoline was of course, the most
frequently used fuel, other fuels amounted to little. Ignition was
most frequently achieved by a magneto. Only 83 engines were
sideshaft.

In any case, we are grateful to Bill Honey for his idea, for we
did enjoy tabulating the data and learning something about the
relative rarity of gas engines. We heard from less than 1% of our
subscribers, so this experiment is far from definitive. The average
number of engines per respondent is over 10.

Gas Engine Magazine
Gas Engine Magazine
Preserving the History of Internal Combustion Engines