JAEGER Cement Mixer ENGINE

By Staff
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Jaeger #308081, 3 HP, 4x6' bore and stroke.
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#4L Jaeger concrete mixer with winch-operated .
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Horsedrawn road grader, manufacturer unknown.

5950 Wilson Drive, Huntington, West Virginia 25705

I thought I would send some pictures of some of my toys. I found
the Jaeger concrete mixer and horse-drawn road grader less than a
mile from my house. Both were covered with honeysuckle and
blackberry bushes. The mixer is a No. 4L patent number from January
29, 1907 to June 12, 1923. The mixer and engine are No. 4L Model
B16B. The engine is a Jaeger (Hercules) #308081, 3 HP with
4?x6′ bore and stroke. I am the third owner. The mixer was
rented in 1938 by the contractor that built my father’s house
with solid concrete basement walls. The engine was free when I
purchased it, thanks to the cabinet it was housed in and all the
oil and caked grease crusted on it. The engine has very good
compression. The EK magneto had spark after cleaning and oiling. I
asked the man I purchased it from if it had a crank. He pointed to
a piece of ?’ pipe driven in the flywheel bolt hole and said,
‘That is it.’ It scared me to look at it.

The engine needs rod and main bearings and a lot of cleaning
before paint. The mixer needs a lot of sheet metal replaced, new
lift cable, clutch and brake lining on the loading hopper winch.
The mixing drum looked like a satellite dish after I removed the
rusted out tub and paddles. I know the engine was painted royal
blue with gold striping. It has the Jaeger emblem on the spark plug
side of the water hopper and the Hercules emblem on the hopper
overhead. I hope someone can tell me what color the mixer and
wheels are supposed to be painted. I found traces of aluminum paint
on the mixer but I also found some traces of concrete under the
paint.

I wrote the Hercules Company in Henderson, Kentucky and got a
very nice reply from Charles V. Statham giving me a I have several
old engines (both gasoline and steam), walking tractors, tools and
chain saws. My favorites are a steam engine my father built for me
when I was one year old and an International Titan Jr. 1 HP that
belonged to my grandfather.

I am a member of the West Virginia Antique Steam and Gas Engine
Club and plan to haul my mixer and other toys to shows on my 1929
model ‘AA’ Ford 1? ton truck (see GEM August 1988, page
9).

Tell everyone that there are still toys to be found, sometimes
closer to home than you think.

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