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Any Wisconsin TFD and Elgin Insight?

Author Photo
By Staff

Help fellow engine collectors identify and learn more about their engines.

tfd-wisconsin
by Marissa Fitzgerald

Researching Grandpa’s engines

 

I am looking for some information on a couple engines that my grandpa has restored. Specifically, the history of the engines, what they were used for, and in today’s market, how much might these old engines be worth? I am also looking for information on where people sell these old engines. One is a TFD Wisconsin engine, serial number 2484318, SP: 118273. The other one is an Elgin, there are no numbers on it and no name plate.

elgin-engine

Is there anyone, a site, or a place where we can get more information? Hope someone can help!

Marissa Fitzgerald
mfitzgerald187@yahoo.com

As far as selling the engines goes, you could search for like items online or in GEM’s Classified section (Page 38). Perhaps that would give you a jumping off point for pricing your engines. You could also publish a classified and ask for offers on the engines. Engine shows and swap meets are great places to make a sale or seek more information. The Farm Collector Show Directory is a great source for finding an event near you. Readers, please reach out to Marissa via email with suggestions or information on these engines. Good luck in your search, Marissa! – Editor


Diamonds in the rough

fairbanks-morse-red

In the editor’s Hit-and-Miss column (August/September 2021), you asked about diamonds in the rough. Here are two engines that I got for free. The gray one is for parts. The red one runs fine after 25 to 30 hours of work. They are both 6hp Fairbanks Morse Z, made in Canada. I have been told the red one, serial number 625166, is a 1917 engine. I have it belted to a Myers 6×6 water pump, which works well.

engine-belted-water-pumpfairbanks-morse-z-gray

Also, in that same issue I read about the jigger in Flywheel Forum. Here is a picture I found in my ancestors house of an odd looking machine that runs on rails. The photo was taken at Ayers Junction, Maine, most likely in the 1930s.

rail-machine-ayers

Larry Colarusso
Charlotte, Maine

Two free engines certainly are rarities, thanks for sharing! Congratulations on getting one of them up and running. The vintage jigger photo is a special find as well! – Editor


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum or your contact information for GEM Experts to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com.

Published on Oct 7, 2021
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