Smoke rings


| November/December 1967



6 Hp. John Deere engine

Courtesy of Robert Vohland, R. R. I, Washington, Illinois 61571

Robert Vohland

I just can hardly believe that this is the last issue of the second year of GEM already. Time really flies or I guess I should say it really goes up in smoke rings.

And no one knows better than a parent how swiftly the years go by for it seems they're hardly out of diapers and there you are - finding yourself at the church watching your young one take their mate which means the beginning of a new life and a new family, and even though you are so happy for them and so eager to welcome a new one into the clan, there is a sweet sadness with it and you wonder how did they become an adult so fast? Yes, our second child, Daughter Dana married Robert Fortenbaugh on August 26. It was a lovely wedding - not without many an upheaval until we heard the wedding march and then all the events of the past and the little troubles that appear through the preparation - as I'm sure they do in all important events - were nothing but a memory and all was worthwhile as you watched a beaming beautiful bride escorted down the aisle by her father to meet her future husband who stood with adoring eyes, as all grooms do when they watch the 'light of their life' approaching the altar In a few minutes they were man and wife, the church reception was over, the newlyweds had dressed and gone - off on a honeymoon to the sea-shore, and the friends that always stand by you slowly make their way home and the rest of the children are in bed and it's very quiet - and you have a good feeling that the young couple are going to have a very wonderful life together - not all happiness, but facing together whatever is their lot, God Bless them. But isn't it odd that little empty space in your heart when they aren't at home. Every time one of them is gone, even for over night, it's like a little empty space appears in my heart and awaits their homecoming whenever it may be - well, I've been called a sentimentalist and I guess I am, but don't you think most parents have these pangs even if they don't admit them--I think so! I'm glad as our children grow up that they find a mate to share their lives with, I wouldn't want it any other way, but that doesn't mean I don't have a right to miss them.

I'm very proud of this 3 H.P. Stickney gas engine. I secured it from its original owner who bought it in 1914 here at Minneapolis, Kansas, new from the dealer. It was in a bad state of rust after being discarded and left to the mercy of the elements for nearly a half century in a shelterbelt on the owner's farm. It now runs as good as new and has full compression and power. The trucks are not original. A fine runner and a fine looker.

Z type Fairbanks on shallow well with grasshopper pump at Devil's Den, California. Engine owned by Jim Everest of Weaverville, California.

Have a letter from Gerald F. Hoffman, 313 E. Peru St., Princeton, Illinois 61356 who writes: In the Sept-Oct. issue of GEM, I see a picture on the cover page of a Geiser Tractor and page two you say that you don't know the age of this Geiser Tractor. Well, I have a book called The Development of The Agricultural Tractor in the United States, and in this book there is a picture of this same Geiser Tractor and the book states that this tractor was made in 1909 and had 4 cylinders engine and was 25-50 hp. and had two forward speeds, 2? and 3? mph. I trust this bit of information will interest your readers. Thank you Gerald for your informative letter.

From Lewis H. Cline, 1102 West River Road, Battle Creek, Michigan, one of our steady contributors of articles to both magazines, Lewis writes/ 'In answer to my inquiry about the Port Huron tractor I received a nice letter and hand I drawing from Douglas A. McConnell,, Box 575, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada. They had two of them at one time.