MY OWN OIL PULL - NOT FOR SALE


| November/December 1968

  • Air cooled engine

  • 20-35 Model M Oil Pull
    Courtesy of Earle Nickerson, R.D.2, Wauchula, Florida 33873
    Earle Nickerson
  • Frick sawmill

    Dorothy B. Smith
  • A Rumely Six
    Courtesy of Dorothy B. Smith, Forest Grove Trailer Park, Ontario, N.Y. 14519
    Dorothy B. Smith
  • I.H.C. tractor and 1968 Polora car.
    Courtesy of LeRoy W. Blaker, Alvordton, Ohio 43501
    LeRoy W. Blaker
  • Old auto sparker
    Courtesy of C.I. Metzger, 2806-5th Ave., Altoona, Pennsylvania 16602.
    C.I. Metzger
  • Yuba ball tread tractor
    Courtesy of James N. Dugger, 1521 Sherman Place, Long Beach, California 90804
    James N. Dugger

  • Air cooled engine
  • 20-35 Model M Oil Pull
  • Frick sawmill
  • A Rumely Six
  • I.H.C. tractor and 1968 Polora car.
  • Old auto sparker
  • Yuba ball tread tractor

R. D. 2 Wauchula, Florida 33873

I will tell you my age so you will know the time I lived in and most remember. I was born in 1915 on a dairy farm near Randolph, N.Y. (Cattaraugus County). I am the oldest of ten children which are all living. After 1927 we moved from one large farm to another. My parents made their last move in 1939 to a large farm in Mayville, N.Y., which one brother still owns.

I remember very plainly my Uncle Nickerson, who had the dealership for the Advance Rumley Company from 1920 to 1929, sold a neighbor John Grover a new oil pull tractor. It was in 1921 or 1922 and a 12-20. Mr. Grover died soon after that so my uncle took it back. This was my first sight of a Rumley.

In 1924 my Uncle Charlie and a over all agent by the name of Jack Helna (I am not sure about the spelling of the last name) sold my dad a new thrashing machine. It was a 22 X 36 the last wooden machine the company built. It had a self feeder, weigher, and wind stacker. This machine cost about $1,350.00 (A lot of money those days.). Mr. Helna was from Rochester, N.Y.



Dad also bought a 10-20 Titan tractor from a Mr. Leo Harkness to run the thrasher.

It was sure some sight when the thrasher and two tractors which Uncle Charlie had sold came in on a railroad car. Half of the village turned out to see them unload them.