Lanz Success Leads To Field Marshal


| November/December 1991



Lanz Bulldog

Veterans Row Westbury, Tasmania, Australia 7303

Since my article on restoring a 1938 Lanz Bulldog in the May 1988 GEM issue, I have been delighted to see a number of articles appearing on the Lanz tractors. I finished my tractor soon after the story appeared, and it has been fitted with the full rear fenders and sign written with the original dealer's name on the flywheel covers. Learning the correct starting procedure had been largely trial and error; most Lanzs used a blow-lamp to heat up the cylinder head, but as mine was a road/farm dual-purpose model it was fitted from new with petrol injection and a trembler coil to fire a spark plug as on a normal engine.

It was found that the best way to get 'motor ovation' was to set the injector nozzle screwed down to deliver a wide fan of fuel into the hot-bowl and to set the fuel control lever wide open to the 630 r.p.m. position. With the steering wheel already placed in the end of the crankshaft, two squirts of fuel are primed into the hot-bowl via the fuel pump, the trembler coil ignited and a hard swing given on the steering wheel. When the engine fired you could bet it would be running the wrong way and you would have to reverse the engine rotation. Once up and running, a change over to fuel oil could be accomplished in five minutes, but recently this system of starting has become quite unreliable, with the engine giving just enough of a cough to keep you swinging the wheel, but refusing to pick up regardless of having fuel and spark. So after collapsing in a heap under the starting wheel and uttering some choice vocab, Father and I decided that there must be a better way. The hot-bowl is removed and it is naturally flooded with petrol. After having the fuel pump and injector rebuilt, I began to despair.

'If I had a blow lamp I bet I could have it going in 10 minutes,' comes a reply from the background. This comment came from another Lanz owner from the Australian mainland. 'Why don't you start it the proper way, with the lamp; it's all we use in Victoria.'

My reply was a polite, 'Well, it's the only system I've used and it came factory fitted, but if you can find a lamp, you're welcome to try it.'

We managed to borrow a lamp from a fellow two-stroke owner and our man proceeded to heat up the hot-bowl. After a rather tense couple of minutes, two pumps were given on the pump, one swing on the wheel, and you guessed it, away she went! Well I had a large serve of humble pie and I now realized that a lamp is the only way to go for starting, as it never failed on two attempts at starting.

James Burrell_1
5/19/2009 8:43:43 PM

Regarding Glen's Lanz Bulldog,His problem is probably a spark plug that will not fire under compression, I have had the same problem with an older tractor than his,I enjoyed his story on the Marshall. If you can find out where to buy new Lanz spark plug let me know, please, James


James Burrell_2
5/19/2009 8:37:26 PM

Regarding Glen's Lanz Bulldog,His problem is probably a spark plug that will not fire under compression, I have had the same problem with an older tractor than his,I enjoyed his story on the Marshall. If you can find out where to buy new Lanz spark plug let me know, please, James