Reflections

A Neward, An Allen Tester, A Stover 6 HP, and Harley Davidson Engines


| October/November 2001



Neward engine

36/10/4b

A Brief Word

This month it is our sad duty to report the passing of a great friend, Roland Porten. Many of you were acquainted with Roland, particularly if you accompanied me on various tours into Germany. Roland and his daughter Christine operated the Rebstock Hotel at Stuhlingen, Germany. However, the major attraction for engine and tractor collectors was Roland's phenomenal collection housed in his Alphof Museum, just outside of Stuhlingen. Roland had experienced health problems the past few years and died suddenly in June of a heart attack. At this point the future of the Alphof is uncertain.

We're moving forward on plans for a tour to Switzerland and Germany next July. Exact dates have not been set yet, as we are trying to schedule in a Rally or two and it might be necessary to juggle things a bit. However, we are planning on a 16-day tour, Chicago to Zurich and Frankfurt to Chicago. We've never thought it quite right when tour companies offer a 'two-week tour package' that includes one day on each end sealed up inside an engined aluminum tube. That leaves only 12 days on the ground, and we all know that the day of arrival is mostly spent on adjusting to the new surroundings. The final day is carefully planned to avoid missing flights or a 3 a.m. wakeup call to scurry to the airport and go through their usual and sometimes frustrating routines! Thus, the two-week tour really ends up with ten good days on the ground!

Contacts are being made in various places, and it looks like we'll be seeing some iron almost every day. Ladies, don't be frightened by this, because we'll also be including some very nice stops that include a bit of retail therapy. One small stop we are planning is to the birthplace of N.A. Otto, inventor of the four-cycle engine. We plan on this when in the neighborhood of our good friend Robert Geyer and his Bulldog Press. Robert has published a great many books at Bulldog, and is known throughout Europe and in other countries as well.

Within the next year we hope to retire from the construction business. Perhaps we'll then have the time to attack some of those dormant projects, moldering for some time now in forgotten recesses of the mind. Since we have most of our own printing equipment, we hope to do some of these from start to finish, thus cutting down on the costs, and keeping the retail price more palatable. We've kicked around in the publishing business for well nigh 40 years now, and we can assure you that all is not as it seems when you plunk down 15 or 20 samoleons for a book, or maybe much more than that! We'll allow that there are some publishers in this world who set their retails primarily on what they think the market will bear. By and large, though, most publishers are willing to sell at a reasonable profit, and to this no one but an abject cheapskate will object, and no one but a wiseacre will complain. 'Nuff said on that subject. We are planning several different books, and even hope to revive our Power in the Past Series with which we began publishing books back in 1971, or 30 years ago.

As is usual this time of year, we don't have many queries since everyone is busy with shows and restorations, but here goes:

36/10/1 Utilitor Information Needed Gene Corns, 3257 N. Charles St., Wichita, KS 67204-4159, has a 1935 Utilitor for which he needs information. It has a Bosch magneto and a Holly NH carburetor. In particular, Gene would like to have the proper settings for valve clearance, plug gap, etc. 'My father-in-law bought it new in 1935 and it was last run in 1948, starting it up again in July 2001. My wife rode on this tractor as a young girl.' Any information would be greatly appreciated.