Southern Tier Antique Gas & Steam Engine Association


| February/March 1990



Bouvier engine

Bouvier engine.

Box 55, Nineveh, New York 13813

On August 25, 26, 27, 1989 the Southern Tier Antique Gas and Steam Engine Association held their fifteenth annual field day and reunion at the Maine Village Park, Maine, NY. There are two parts to the Association. They are the Satellite Club, which is a working club where members go to each other's houses to work on engines and solve their mechanical problems, and the Association itself, the business end of it.

Every year the club has grown and the village park, with its nice pavilions and many acres of flat level land, has become too small for our many exhibits and camper parking. Thus, the club is in the process of buying land. They have started a fund for such a purpose. In the near future we hope to have a much larger place with our own pavilions, club house and a place to work on engines. We'd even like to grow things to harvest and demonstrate the way of life years ago.

The 1989 show had many of the old faces and the standby exhibits. As usual there were many new faces and exhibits, some for the first time. One first time exhibit was Crosby Sheeley P.O. Box 132, Cottekill, New York 12419, with his recently restored 'Auto Red Bug' driven by a Smith motor wheel. Mr. Sheeley believes that Smith Motor Wheel was a supplier to Briggs and Stratton.

There were many unusual and scarce tractors. One in particular was a 1957 Bantam tractor, owned by George Hawn, which was not much larger than the ones children use in tractor pulls. George rescued this piece of rusty iron three weeks before the show. Come show time, it looked like brand new. Ralph Loomis's Oil Pull made its fifteenth appearance. The last fourteen years it operated his shingle mill at the show. This year the shingle mill was idle. Ralph could not find suitable blocks to make shingles. Logs have become too expensive to make and give shingles away to spectators.

We had numerous old cars and trucks. The 1950 Crossley looked like it came of the showroom floor; the 1928 Chevrolet 1 ton truck and a 1930 Ford pickup didn't look bad either. There was a scale model of a Model T and about a half scale model of a 1903 Cadillac.