Smoke Rings


| May/June 1983



Smoke Rings

The G.E.M. Family is all very busy like the birds and the bees with the Shows about to swing into another season of engine energies, tractor talk and admiring glances at the restored items and newly discovered old ones. Keep in touch with us and don't forget to give us the human interest parts and puns. No need to ramble on as there are many goodies coming out the stack of Smoke Rings.

A letter of appreciation comes from ERNEST L. PEASE, Route 2, Box 160, Harpursville, New York 13787: 'I would like to take this opportunity to thank the many people for all the information sent me on my request of my Empire tractor. I had to completely disassemble it to wash and scrape off the layers of old dried oil, grease, rust and curled up and dried paint. It took me and Anna a week of steady work and 5 gallons of universal spirits. We got off nearly every speck of old grease. Had a lot of masking to do as I wanted to spray it. Gave everything a primer coat first. My son-in-law was here on his vacation with my daughter, June. I let him have the honor of spraying all the parts. My daughter had to keep making trips into Binghamton to the auto finisher store for more school bus yellow paint, which he had to mix especially for me to get the correct original yellow. It took a total of 2 gallons to spray it top and bottom. I finished it too late in the season to take it to our Club's Show in Maine, N.Y. I bought a tag-a-long trailer this year and took it to several shows. It drew a good crowd at them all and a lot of people remarked that they had never seen one. I did run into one man that said he owned one years ago.

'I am enclosing a picture of the Empire. I had not removed the masking tape from the head lamps yet. The nuts were later painted black along with the fan, governor and air cleaner and a few other parts. It starts and runs really nice. It was surely worth all the work and money for the paint. This Empire tractor mfg. 11-1947, Model 90. S/N 5943, Engine #J150947. Keep up the fine work that G.E.M. and your column does. (Well, that's one more satisfied gas buff.)

An answer to one of the letters comes from WALTER S. KASAL RR1, Box 87, Chelsea, Iowa 52215 as he writes: 'To answer Bill Obernolte of Chateau, Montana, the name of the tractor he found and pictured on page 10 of Jan/Feb. 1983, is a Flour City made by Kinnard-Haines Co. Minneapolis, Minnesota, The 20 HP model had 6' drive wheels with 16' face. Engine bore and stroke was 4 x 5 and had two clutches. The 30 and 40 HP tractors had two piece crankshafts with four main bearings, two in the center. Each half crankshaft had a flange and the two flanges were bolted together in the center between the two center main bearings. That is the reason why the engine blocks on the big tractors had a wide space between them, and yes, the one Bill found is about a 1912 model. I very much enjoy the G.E.M. and have all copies.'

'I am writing again PLEADING for help on my old Pierce engine.I had a little note in the magazine last July asking for help and got responses from two of our good engine buffs. These two good friends both have a Pierce with 2' pistons and mine has a 5' in which the set-up is considerably different.

'My engine, as well as the two mentioned above, is a vertical-built engine. The cylinder wall, water jacket and head is one casting with the firing chamber at the bottom. I need to communicate with someone about the carburetion, ignition, setup, governors and the paint color. Come on out there in GEM land- do we have any more Pierce owners?