Smoke Rings


| May/June 1977



Smoke Rings

Hi! To each and every one of you out there in Gas Engine Land--How'a feelin? Down a little? Well, regardless what---remember 'That is the Day that the Lord hath made, we will Rejoice and be glad in it'---ever sing that? Its a tremendous uplifting tune comes from Psalms 118:24-I might suggest, if you are down sing praises to the Lord, even if you don't feel like it (The Lord inhabits the praises of His people) and if you don't know what to say-take one of the Psalms and sing it-doesn't matter about the tune, or just say it aloud-God will honor it-I promise you it will help chase the blues, or the downs or whatever--Many good letters coming to you -beginning with one from W. J. RUNDLE, 2565 D. Kleindaie Road, Tuscon, Arizona 85716, (who, by the way, also says Smoke Rings continues to be the most interesting part of G.E.M. to him -and that's because all you fellow gas enthusiasts take the time to share your letters and bits of information with each other)

I need some help in identifying the engine shown in the picture and hope that you will ask the readers of SMOKE RINGS to help. It has a name plate which says 'Kratz & McClelland, Construction Equipment Machinery, San Francisco.' Three collector friends in that area have not heard of Kratz & McClelland and did not recognize the engine. I am guessing that K & McC sold it but did not make it. It is not very old judging from the design and components, but it is different and it interests me. Has a single relatively small flywheel but the crankshaft has heavy counter weights. The crankshaft and camshaft both have Timken roller bearings. Ignition is by an American Bosch Type S magneto. Power take off is from the camshaft and on the opposite side from the flywheel. It is throttle-governed and the mixer sucks gas out of the tank shown in the lower left. Cooling is with water in the tank bolted to the block and head on the right side. The letters A G are cast with part numbers in several places and the serial number is A G 17114. Will appreciate word from anybody who knows who madeit.

Some information and a compliment makes us happy coming from JOHN A. RICHTER, 26444 Taft Road, Novi, Michigan 48050: 'Your magazines are the best on the market today! I am now very nearly 75 years of age and have been around a farm the most of my life. I attended Michigan State Auto school in 1922, received my diploma December 23, 1922. Have been with gas engines, tractors and autos and all kinds of threshing and farm equipment ever since.

Now, a little information for the gas engine repairmen. Timing your stationary water-cooled engines, tractors, autos etc., piston should be a top dead center, exhaust valve just closed as piston travels downward. Itwill then draw in a new charge of fresh gas. Timing ignition S/32 before top dead center on compression stroke. Retard spark if possible before starting engine. I have been asked about using white gas. White gas of Model T days was fine as it was regular gas. A good lot of the water-cooled engines were made to run on a good grade of kerosene. Hope this will help some beginners. Questions will be answered with SASE.'

ALAN C. KING, 4790 River Road, Radnor, Ohio 43066 who advertises two of his books in our magazine, asked me to pass this word along: 'Please tell all my customers out there that I have appreciated their comments, but due to the large volume of mail that I handle, it is almost impossible to individually answer them all.'

REED SKINNER, 807 River Acres Drive, Tecumseh, Michigan 49286 has at this time only two engines, but he is very enthusiastic about them and is awaiting your letters: