Oil Field Engine News

Oil Field Stover

| February 2005

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    First built in 1928, the CT-series engines were totally enclosed. This being a 1941 model, we can assume it was one of the last built. Check out the hot-tube ignition conversion replacing the stock spark plug and magneto.
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    The Stover’s only protection from the elements was a thin piece of corrugated sheet metal. Three bits, possibly used to drill the well, can be seen behind the engine.
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    A 3 HP Associated on an early portable mixer, circa 1920
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    The 5 HP Stover on its way to a place far away from any oil field duties. What a find!
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    A 4 HP Moore “Sure Cool” and mixer photographed in Michigan some time before 1920
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    A Rock?Island running a mixer in the 1920s

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Two good friends of mine, Dave and Kent Park of Bluffton, Ind., recently showed me an engine they were able to obtain from the oil well lease it was on near Cambridge, Ohio. Their great engine find is another example of an engine make that was put into service in the oil fields, but is not normally associated with the oil industry.

This 5 HP Stover engine was attached to a single well pump jack. The serial number, TD-273127, on the Stover tag indicates it was built in 1941, according to the serial numbers listed in the back of C.H. Wendel's book, Power of the Past Vol. 3. It is one of the enclosed-style "CT" model engines.

The engine had been converted from magneto to hot-tube ignition, a common practice in the oil fields where operators could utilize the wellhead gas for ignition and engine fuel. The hot-tube and its chimney were attached directly to the spark plug hole.

The lease operator reportedly pumped it only four hours every Saturday during the last years of the well's production. He had provided it its own little "house" for protection from the elements when it was not in operation, which consisted simply of a panel of corrugated steel with a couple of notches cut into it for the pump jack that was laid directly on top of the engine.



In the photos, you can see that three of the bits possibly used to drill the well have been put to use as a counterweight for the pump jack.

Thanks goes to Dave and Kent for sharing their interesting find with us. I would encourage our readers to share with us their discoveries in the oil fields.



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