'My Mogul Engine'


| January/February 1970



Mogul Engine

Courtesy of Wilbur Peters, 4023 South Quaker Road, Gasport, New York 14067.

Wilbur Peters

4023 South Quaker Road Gasport, New York 14067

Enclosed is a picture and story about my Mogul engine. First I want to congratulate you on your wonderful magazine, 'Gem'. I look forward to each issue.

The engine, built in 1914, is a 16 hp. Mogul with a trip magneto igniter. It runs 400 rpm with a throttling governor. Made by International Harvester Co., these engines were then used on their 8-16 Mogul tractors.

This special engine was used to power a cider mill at Newfane, New York for about 50 years. It remained stationary all that time. The Mogul engine was first bought by Mr. Willliam Thomkins, who operated the mill and sold farm machinery. His son, Howard Thomkins, working side by side with his father since the age of fourteen, later took over the complete operation that lasted many years. The last owner, Mr. Ralph Keynon, purchased the mill in 1955. He now resides in the house above the mill that was in full operation until six years ago. The old engine has been silent since then. Mrs. Keynon relates how the residents of Newfane could always tell when they were making cider, as the old engine could be heard echoing down the Creek Valley behind the village.

I found the engine on a hunch. Approaching the area, I saw the old mill at the bottom of a steep hill. As I came closer to the mill, I could see the cylinder by the open door of the engine room. Inquiring, I learned that the engine was for sale, but moving it would be a problem. The engine weighed about 4,000 pounds and the forward part of the engine room would have to be dismantled in order to remove the engine itself. It was late fall when I purchased it, but it was not until early spring before I was able to remove it.

I stripped the engine and cut the bolts on the concrete foundation. Then I removed the flywheel which weighs about 800 pounds. The flywheel was much lower than the frame and would have been difficult to move without high skids.