International Harvester Oddity

Part one of three: Restoring a 2 HP IHC Nonpareil

| December 2006

  • 12-06-023-1-round-crank-cas.jpg
    The Nonpareil engine with round inspection hole and rounded crankcase.
  • 12-06-023-4-turning-bearing.jpg
    Turning the external dimensions of both bearings.
  • 12-06-023-3-Removing-bearin.jpg
    The puller arrangement through the crankcase to remove the main bearings (plug on LHS).
  • 12-06-023-2-First-home.jpg
    The engine and a box of “bits” back in the workshop.
  • 12-06-023-7-fitting-bearing.jpg
    The crankshaft and bearing showing the blue dye, partway through the scraping process.
  • 12-06-023-5-cutting-grease-.jpg
    The bearings on lathe to cut grease groove with the ground high speed steel cutter.
  • 12-06-023-6-new-bearing.jpg
    A finished bearing showing the grease grooves, resting on an old bearing shell.
  • 12-06-023-10-drillling-valv.jpg
    Drilling for the valve sleeves.
  • 12-06-023-9-Valve-seat-Cobb.jpg
    The usty valve seats in the cylinder head.
  • 12-06-023-8-cly-head-Cobbed.jpg
    Top of the cylinder head, with corroded valve and plastic metal repair to rocker.
  • 12-06-023-11-fitting-Vavl-s.jpg
    The valve sleeves ready for fitting.
  • 12-06-023-12-New-Valves.jpg
    The new valves; the retaining nuts were changed later.
  • 12-06-023-14-rocker-arm.jpg
    The rocker arm on the milling table for a skim cut to true it up. (As this was a light cut, Peter cheated and did not bother to change over to the milling chuck.)
  • 12-06-023-13-scraping-vavle.jpg
    The valve seats – one scraped and the other in original condition.
  • 12-06-023-17-measure-gap.jpg
    Ready to measure the piston ring gap. The end of the liner can be seen and the oil hole.
  • 12-06-023-15-cylinder-wear.jpg
    The cylinder showing the ridge from wear at the top of the stroke.
  • 12-06-023-18-fit-rings.jpg
    Fitting the second piston ring using shim stock. The clean up of skim cut on the piston skirt can be seen.
  • 12-06-023-16-truing-piston.jpg
    Turning the piston ring grooves using the ground high speed steel cutter.
  • 12-06-023-19-Ring-compresso.jpg
    The ring compressor being used to fit the piston in the cylinder.

  • 12-06-023-1-round-crank-cas.jpg
  • 12-06-023-4-turning-bearing.jpg
  • 12-06-023-3-Removing-bearin.jpg
  • 12-06-023-2-First-home.jpg
  • 12-06-023-7-fitting-bearing.jpg
  • 12-06-023-5-cutting-grease-.jpg
  • 12-06-023-6-new-bearing.jpg
  • 12-06-023-10-drillling-valv.jpg
  • 12-06-023-9-Valve-seat-Cobb.jpg
  • 12-06-023-8-cly-head-Cobbed.jpg
  • 12-06-023-11-fitting-Vavl-s.jpg
  • 12-06-023-12-New-Valves.jpg
  • 12-06-023-14-rocker-arm.jpg
  • 12-06-023-13-scraping-vavle.jpg
  • 12-06-023-17-measure-gap.jpg
  • 12-06-023-15-cylinder-wear.jpg
  • 12-06-023-18-fit-rings.jpg
  • 12-06-023-16-truing-piston.jpg
  • 12-06-023-19-Ring-compresso.jpg

After scouting around for a new project, word came of an "Osborne" engine ripe for restoration. It was only being sold because the owner was trying to raise money to purchase a rare tractor. At that time, I had little knowledge of the engine's history and thought I was being offered an ordinary International Harvester. However, research on the Internet soon provided a lot of background information.

Engine history

Osborne engines were manufactured by IHC while the company was under investigation by the government for unfair trading. To get around this dispute they marketed Nonpareil engines under the names of Osborne and McCormick based on the Famous, and Titan engines under the Deering banner. My Nonpareil engine, no. KG 671, was manufactured in 1911, sold by Osborne and painted blue rather than red.

There were a few small changes in the engine construction from the Famous: It was lighter, the base casting had a rounded profile, the hand plate (inspection cover) was round and the pipe-work layout was different. In the case of my 2 HP engine, some International Junior parts were used rather than those of the standard 2 HP Famous, but I do not know if this was common practice - it probably was.

My purchase

The engine was basically in bits as restoration of this engine had already been started with new fuel and water pump pistons and wrist pins. In addition, new castings had already been made from a broken exhaust valve rocker and governor bracket. The cylinder head and valves were rusted and clearly required work. The cylinder bore was thick with grease and the piston appeared a reasonable fit, but I was to discover later that there was excessive wear. There were numerous pieces missing, the most important being the hand plate with the engine details on it. I later managed to read the engine number stamped on the end of the crankshaft.



2 HP Famous
Weight 840 pounds
RPM 400/480
Flywheel diameter 24 inches
Flywheel width 2-1/2 inches

2HP Nonpareil
Weight 615 pounds
RPM 420/500
Flywheel diameter 22 inches
Flywheel width 2-1/2 inches



SUBSCRIBE TO GAS ENGINE MAGAZINE TODAY!

Gas Engine Magazine A_M 16Gas Engine Magazine is your best source for tractor and stationary gas engine information.  Subscribe and connect with more than 23,000 other gas engine collectors and build your knowledge, share your passion and search for parts, in the publication written by and for gas engine enthusiasts! Gas Engine Magazine brings you: restoration stories, company histories, and technical advice. Plus our Flywheel Forum column helps answer your engine inquiries!

Be sure to take advantage of the Square Deal Subscription Program.

  • No Missed Issues.

  • No Renewal Notices.

  • No Additional Cost.

The Square Deal Subscription Program is designed as a paperless transaction with automatic renewals at a preferred low rate.   With advanced electronic notification, a 100% satisfaction guarantee and an easy opt-out plan, the Square Deal Subscription Program is the best value, risk free, eco-friendliest way to subscribe.




Facebook YouTube

Classifieds