Finishing an Ingeco Engine Restoration

Peter Rooke puts the final touches on his 2-1/2 HP Ingeco restoration – Part 3 of 3

| April/May 2013

  • Ingeco
    Peter Rooke’s 2-1/2 HP Model AK Ingeco after an extensive restoration.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Ingeco fuel tank
    The fuel tank showing the leak around the tap as well as peeling paint.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • New boss
    The new boss ready to be soldered in place.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Primed tank
    The primed tank ready for painting.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Turning the tap body
    Beginning to turn the tap body.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Completed Ingeco tap
    The completed tap.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Boring the taper in the tap body
    Boring the taper in the tap body.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Marked sheet metal
    Sheet metal marked out for the crank guard.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Starting safety seam
    Starting to form the safety seam.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Forming crank guard ridges
    Forming the ridges in the crank guard.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Forming tools used in making the ridge
     The forming tools used to form the ridge.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Primed hopper
    The hopper and cylinder have been sanded down, and the main casting has been painted with primer filler.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Crank guard completed
    The completed crank guard.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Ingeco stencil
    The stencil in position.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Painted hopper
    The hopper lining marked out with pencil.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Ingeco lettering
    The almost completed Ingeco lettering.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Painting the flywheel
    The flywheel marked out for pinstriping, with two spokes completed.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Turning the pulley
    Turning the pulley. Note the reference lines.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Hopper painted
    The hopper-side with lining completed.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Cutting the thicker shims
    Starting to cut out the thicker shims.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Temporary timing marks of a flywheel
    Tape on the flywheel with temporary timing marks.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Completed Ingeco shims
    The completed shims.
    Photo By Peter Rooke
  • Restored Ingeco engine
    The engine ran very smoothly with little vibration, even with the cart on asphalt, which tends to magnify any problem.
    Photo By Peter Rooke

  • Ingeco
  • Ingeco fuel tank
  • New boss
  • Primed tank
  • Turning the tap body
  • Completed Ingeco tap
  • Boring the taper in the tap body
  • Marked sheet metal
  • Starting safety seam
  • Forming crank guard ridges
  • Forming tools used in making the ridge
  • Primed hopper
  • Crank guard completed
  • Ingeco stencil
  • Painted hopper
  • Ingeco lettering
  • Painting the flywheel
  • Turning the pulley
  • Hopper painted
  • Cutting the thicker shims
  • Temporary timing marks of a flywheel
  • Completed Ingeco shims
  • Restored Ingeco engine

This is the third in a three-part series on Peter Rooke's restoration of an Ingeco engine. You can read part 1 in Ingeco Model AK Is Reborn and part 2 in Ingeco Engine Gets a New Life. 

Fuel tank tap and pinhole repair

The joint where the fuel tap joined the fuel tank was leaking and looked as though it had been repaired with epoxy. Before starting any work on the tank, I flushed it out with copious amounts of water and then placed it upside down overnight so it could drain.

It appeared that incorrect primer was used on the galvanized finish, as the paint was peeling off the galvanized tank. After I cleaned off the old paint, the best solution appeared to be to remove the seat for the tap fitting, plus the feed from the start tank (gas), and re-solder them.

The fuel tank has a small compartment to hold gas for starting, then it can be switched over to kerosene for running. The leaking fitting almost fell off, and the copper pipe from the start tank was sawn through to remove the tap. I melted the solder to remove the remains of the pipe from the gas tank.



First, I cleaned up the hole in the tank for the tap seat and then enlarged it until there was a ring of strong, clean metal before making a boss to fit in this hole. I turned this new boss from a piece of brass and tapped 0.50-inch NPT for the tap fitting before soldering it in place.

I soldered the copper pipe from the start tank to the two-way tap into both the tank and the tap. This meant that if the tap had to be removed for any reason, the solder had to be melted. To make such a task easier, I made a small compression fitting to screw on the end of the tap. I then soldered a new piece of copper pipe to the tank.



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