'Grand Daddy' THE PRODUCT OF PERSEVERANCE


| July/August 1993



Gas Engine

969 Iron Bridge Mount Joy, Pennsylvania 17552.

This is a story about my husband's 8 HP throttle governed New Way gas engine manufactured approximately 1917.

Ed Grimsey, 969 Iron Bridge Road, Mount Joy, PA 17522, owns this 8 HP throttle governed New Way engine, which dates approximately to 1917- For the story of its restoration, see 'Grand Daddy, The Product of Perseverance,' written by Ed's wife Lucille, inside this issue.

One winter afternoon several years ago, my husband Ed, our son Eddie, and our neighbor Paul Brubaker drove up the steep driveway to our home. They had been to John Ritter's Engine Shed. In the bed of the pickup truck was a huge, rusty, old New Way gas engine. To me, it looked like the 'Grand Daddy' of all New Ways! Those flywheels looked so gigantic! I stared at the thing with a frozen smile on my face while my mind rapidly calculated the amount of work necessary for this massive mess to look like its smaller predecessors. I shrugged and thought-'It will take him all winter to get ready for the spring shows. Ed, smiling and very happy, was oblivious to my reaction. Little did we know what lay ahead before this 8 HP engine would be operative and finished.

When 'Grand Daddy' reached the top of Ed's priority list, he began, as he had in every other restoration, with a complete disassembly of the engine. Needed were new wrist pins, wrist pin bushings and a new camshaft bushing. Also, Ed had to fabricate new valves. He adjusted the mains and rod bearings, sandblasted the total engine, and prepared it for painting. (I think the paint preparation is his favorite part). He sanded, filed, and sanded again until the time was at hand for the final prime coat. Suddenly things started to depart from normal. Let me explain.

Ed has a self-made portable work stand for restoring engines. It has wheels so that he can move it around easily. It was while Grand Daddy was on this cart that disaster struck! Ed had just finished wet-sanding the engine, and had forgotten to replace the grate over the floor drain. By now I'm sure you know what happened-one of those wheels made a straight path for the small, 4' hole in the basement floor, and 'Grand Daddy' toppled over. You could say that the project almost went 'down the drain.'