Galloway Rises From the Ashes


| March/April 1986



1 HP Galloway engine

Route 2, Carroll, IA 51401

About five to six years ago I got a phone call one evening and the conversation went something like this: 'Hello. Hello, Walt? This is Jim Miller.' 'O, hello, Jim.' 'Say, Walt, I had a barn fire yesterday and you know those engines in the horse stalls are all shot.' 'O gosh, Jim, that is too bad.' (I could hear the tears splashing on the table.) 'I'll help you fix them up.' 'No, I'm not going to fix them up. I spent one whole winter on each one and they're much worse now than they were when I started. You want them? I'll sell them for iron price.' 'Sure, I'll take them, but I think you should reconsider.' 'No, my mind's made up you come and get them.' 'O.K., Jim, I'll be over tomorrow.' 'Good night, Jim, and I'll see you.'

Well, the next morning I hooked up the trailer and headed to Denison. When I got to Jim's yard there sat six burnt down hulks, all a uniform color of red rust as a result of the paint and grease all burned off and a generous amount of water applied by the fire department. The oilers and mags were burned off, springs just rusty wire, bearings all gone, wood on carts gone, axles in a bend and gas tanks exploded. It sure was a mess. I wasn't near as sure I still wanted them as I was the night before.

About then Jim showed up, and I offered my condolences and again urged him to keep them, but he said 'No'. Well, we loaded the junk up and I asked, 'How much money, Jim?' He said, 'Well, I'd like to have a hundred dollars.' I said, 'If I get one fixed up of the lot it will be worth quite a lot more than that, so I'll give you one hundred and fifty dollars.' He said, 'Well, thank you, they are all yours.' The roster of the pile was this: 3 HP Hercules, 1 HP Monitor with pump jack, 1 HP Galloway, 1 HP Waterloo Model E, 1 IHC Model M, and a 1 Vi HP Headless Fairbanks Z. These were all running before the fire.

When I got home with them my wife asked why I hadn't just left them off at the junk yard as I drove by. I put them all in my shed and kind of kept each one separate so I could tell what belonged where. I didn't get started on the Galloway until the next day and when I drug it out to start work I noticed that the hopper and the hollow under the camrod were full of wet charcoal. I took the head off and the bearing caps as well. Next I took the crankshaft and set it on the concrete floor. It began to roll to the side as I watched and that's when I became aware the crank was sprung. More headaches I knew were sure to follow. I pulled out the piston and rod, and sure enough, the rings were weak as tin.

I then honed out the bore and oiled it, cleaned up the head, and looked up a pair of usable valves and ground them in, ordered some springs and quit for the day.