Flywheel Fuel System Painting Assembly

Part four in a five-part series: Restoring an Amanco Hired Man

| April 2006

  • 04-06-011-Part-4j.jpg
    The assembled flywheel showing the governor springs and adjusting screws. The new key and post for the starting handle are also visible.
  • 04-06-011-Part-4a-Flywheel.jpg
    The flywheel on the milling machine. The Flywheel was mounted on a specially made mandrel fitted to the horizontal shaft of the milling machine and a cutting tool fitted to an old cross vice which was mounted on the table of the mill.
  • 04-06-011-part-4g.jpg
    The pressing for the fuel tank and the new filler cap.
  • 04-06-011-part-4i.jpg
    The completed fuel mixer and pipework painted.
  • 04-06-011-Part-4b-govener.jpg
    The refurbished governor parts. The old weights and mounting bracket together with the new springs and the adjusting bolts I made.
  • 04-06-011-Part-4d.jpg
    The detent arm with the new brass bushing I made and the cleaned brass adjusting screw.
  • 04-06-011-Part-4e.jpg
    The fuel mixer as found, with bent adjusting screw and pin to stop movement of the brass knob.
  • 04-06-011-Part-4c.jpg
    The old and new floating guide for the governor.

  • 04-06-011-Part-4j.jpg
  • 04-06-011-Part-4a-Flywheel.jpg
  • 04-06-011-part-4g.jpg
  • 04-06-011-part-4i.jpg
  • 04-06-011-Part-4b-govener.jpg
  • 04-06-011-Part-4d.jpg
  • 04-06-011-Part-4e.jpg
  • 04-06-011-Part-4c.jpg

The flywheels, as befitting an early Amanco, are 2-1/4 inches wide and 18 inches in diameter. They were very rusted so I decided to try and machine them to remove the majority of the pitting from the sides and face.

Unfortunately the maximum size I can turn on my lathe is 10 inches, and the largest lathe I could beg any time on only swung 14 inches. Fortunately my milling machine worked on the horizontal as well as the vertical, and by making a special mandrel to fit the horizontal taper I was able to true up the flywheels.

The pulley was far easier to clean up, as I was able to mount this on a mandrel on my lathe. It looked as good as new when finished with only a modest amount of metal being removed.

The springs and adjusting bolts on the governor assembly needed replacing. The springs were purchased and new adjusting stems made from 1/4-inch steel rods. I also made new square head bolts and adjusting nuts, and cleaned out the threads in the weights.



The floating guide for the governor was very thin from rust and a new one was turned from a 1-5/16-inch length of 2-1/4-inch diameter steel (dimensions for the grooves being estimated from the original, and the size of the 1/2-inch brass bush on the speed detent arm).

The brass bush on the detent arm was misshapen and a new one was made from 1/2-inch diameter brass that left a rolling fit on the arm.



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