Bates and Edmonds Bull Dog restoration, Part 4

A Bull Dog gets its bite back

| May 2009

  • bulldog16

  • bulldog1
    The iron fitting used as the basis of the mixer.
  • bulldog4
    Preparing to drill through the tube running across the venturi after it was brazed in position.
  • bulldog5
    Rotary table used on the mill to cut part of the choke plate.
  • bulldog2
    Main mixer body, part brazed. The shoulder to fit inside the pipe fitting is just visible.
  • bulldog8
    The check valve, pipe fittings, needle valve and seat.
  • bulldog6
    Completed choke plates.
  • bulldog7
    Using a dial gauge to set the top slide to the taper of the valve reamer.
  • bulldog9
    The complete mixer.
  • bulldog11
    Brass plate with roller, ready for application of mask.
  • bulldog10
    Name plate mask.
  • bulldog13
    Name tag before stamping with engine details. Since the engine number was not known, it was left blank.
  • bulldog14
    Main frame completed and ready for assembly.
  • bulldog15
    Cart showing axles and mounting bolts.
  • bulldog17
    The finished engine.

  • bulldog16
  • bulldog1
  • bulldog4
  • bulldog5
  • bulldog2
  • bulldog8
  • bulldog6
  • bulldog7
  • bulldog9
  • bulldog11
  • bulldog10
  • bulldog13
  • bulldog14
  • bulldog15
  • bulldog17

Editor’s note: The following is Part 4 of a four-part series on Peter Rooke’s restoration of a 1-1/2 HP Bates & Edmonds Bull Dog.

Fuel Mixer
All that remained of the original fuel mixer was a broken rusty stub in the cylinder head. I had been able to take some external measurements to go with some photographs that had been taken of a friend’s mixer.

The first item that I needed was a cast pipe fitting that could be adapted for the bend and mounting to the cylinder head, part of which was cut off to get the right profile. To make it easier to machine the mixer, the main body would be fabricated from six pieces of steel!

A 2.5-inch length of 1-inch internal diameter iron tube was turned to match the smaller diameter of the pipe bend and then bored out smooth. The venturi was then machined from a 2.625-inch length of solid steel, a 0.500-inch hole first drilled through the length of the steel before cutting a taper in both ends, leaving approximately 0.750 inch in the center as 0.500 inch outside diameter for the constriction.



The diameter of the venturi piece was reduced to fit inside the tube leaving 0.125 inch protruding to fit into the end of the pipe bend in order to provide a locating lug when brazing together.
A piece of 2-inch diameter steel was machined next to form the outside of the bell mouth at the bottom of the mixer, cutting a parallel taper inside.

The bell mouth, center tubes and venturi were the first components to be brazed together and were then cleaned up. This part of the assembly was then put on the lathe and the internal tapers tidied up, to ensure a smooth surface with no ridges to interrupt air flow. At the same time the shoulder was cut to take the fixed part of the choke plate.



SUBSCRIBE TO GAS ENGINE MAGAZINE TODAY!

Gas Engine Magazine A_M 16Gas Engine Magazine is your best source for tractor and stationary gas engine information.  Subscribe and connect with more than 23,000 other gas engine collectors and build your knowledge, share your passion and search for parts, in the publication written by and for gas engine enthusiasts! Gas Engine Magazine brings you: restoration stories, company histories, and technical advice. Plus our Flywheel Forum column helps answer your engine inquiries!

Be sure to take advantage of the Square Deal Subscription Program.

  • No Missed Issues.

  • No Renewal Notices.

  • No Additional Cost.

The Square Deal Subscription Program is designed as a paperless transaction with automatic renewals at a preferred low rate.   With advanced electronic notification, a 100% satisfaction guarantee and an easy opt-out plan, the Square Deal Subscription Program is the best value, risk free, eco-friendliest way to subscribe.




Facebook YouTube

Classifieds