Bates and Edmonds Bull Dog restoration, Part 3

A Bull Dog gets its bite back

| February 2009

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    Flywheel set up to cut keyway using homemade toggle tool.
    Peter Rooke
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    The new metal plate in the base of the fuel tank.
    Peter Rooke
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    Boring hole for crankshaft through flywheel.
    Peter Rooke
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    Broken oil tube, the temporary plug, used to extract it, still in place.
    Peter Rooke
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    Homemade drill extension.
    Peter Rooke
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    The igniter casting cleaned up, ready to start machining.
    Peter Rooke
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    The threads tapped in the mounting holes being used to secure the igniter to the late face plate to turn the inside.
    Peter Rooke
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    Boring center hole prior to threading for pipe.
    Peter Rooke
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    The fixed and moving contacts plus spring.
    Peter Rooke
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    The lip and block.
    Peter Rooke
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    Setting up the casting to drill the holes for the fixed and moving contacts.
    Peter Rooke
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    The completed igniter.
    Peter Rooke
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    Inside view of trip finger.
    Peter Rooke
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    Outside view of trip finger.
    Peter Rooke
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    Lower rock arm casting after machining and before assembly.
    Peter Rooke
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    Governor shoe and latch.
    Peter Rooke
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    Boring center of gear to fit crankshaft.
    Peter Rooke
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    Original pushrod and ends.
    Peter Rooke
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    Temporary assembly of the gears, rock arm, and governor shoe to test movement.
    Peter Rooke
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    Governor assembly.
    Peter Rooke

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Editor’s note: The following is Part 3 of a four-part series on Peter Rooke’s restoration of a 1-1/2 HP Bates & Edmonds Bull Dog. 

Flywheels
Replacement flywheels had been cast, which needed cleaning, boring to the crankshaft diameter of 1.375 inches before cutting slots for the gib keys.


The flywheels were mounted on the milling table and it was just possible to bore them by moving the mounting arm for the vertical mill farther out beyond its normal working position. The wheels were levelled using various parallels under the rims and clamped to the table before facing one side of the hub. The center point of the flywheel was measured and centered under the boring tool and the center hole bored.


When both flywheels had been bored, they were in turn mounted on a mandrel that was fitted to the horizontal output of the mill so the flywheel could be turned, to face the other side of the boss, and turn the outer surface of the rim and its sides. This was a time-consuming exercise as only a slow speed could be used with a fine cut in view of the jury-rigged mounting of the wheels. The skin of the cast iron was so hard that this turning exercise used up several replacement carbide tips.



 
The next step was to cut the keyways. Having been quoted $100 for a used broach, which I would then have to set up in a press I did not have, I decided to make a slot cutting tool, and spent a couple of days cleaning up some scrap metal and machining to make a small toggle press. This filled a gap in my equipment and would be used on other occasions.


The flywheel was mounted on the side face of the mill, after removing some bolts that secured the ring around the horizontal output, to provide mounting points. Each flywheel was then set up, ensuring that the bore was square to the milling table. This enabled the press to be securely mounted on the milling table, and the adjustments it offered could be used to control the depth and position of the cut.