A Sparker For Your Engine


| June/July 1988

  • Circular magnetic lines
    Fig. #1
  • Buzz coil points

  • B & S coils on later models

  • B & S coils on later models

  • B & S coils on later models

  • Magnetic flux lines
    Fig. #2
  • B & S coils on later models

  • Two coils around an iron
    Fig. #4
  • Electro magnet
    Fig. #3
  • Diagram

  • Diagram
    Fig.#5
  • Model T For Buzz Coil

  • Startle
    Fig. #6
  • High Tension ignition system
    Fig. #7

  • Circular magnetic lines
  • Buzz coil points
  • B & S coils on later models
  • B & S coils on later models
  • B & S coils on later models
  • Magnetic flux lines
  • B & S coils on later models
  • Two coils around an iron
  • Electro magnet
  • Diagram
  • Diagram
  • Model T For Buzz Coil
  • Startle
  • High Tension ignition system

557 East 3460, Provo, Utah 84604 and Rex A. Whiting, D.D.S., Box I46, 5I West Center, Heber City, Utah 84032

Often all the mechanical work is complete on a fine little model gasoline engine, or a grand old restored engine, and then comes the question; 'what am I going to do for an ignition system?' If that is your dilemma, then here is an answer.

To help understand the operation a little better, first we'll have a very basic course on electromagnetism.

Whenever electrical current flows thru a conductor such as a wire, circular magnetic lines of force form around that conductor. (See Fig. #1)



Now if you take that wire and wrap it into a coil, the magnetic flux lines complement each other. (See Fig. #2)

If an iron core is placed in the coil, the flux lines will travel thru the iron. The flux lines like iron because they can travel thru it much easier than thru air. We have now created an electro magnet. (See Fig. #3)