Louis Runkles' George B. Miller Engine


| 7/15/2019 1:52:00 PM


george-b-miller-7hp
The George B. Miller looks every bit like a Waterloo engine, which is no surprise given George B. Miller's connection to Waterloo Gas Engine Co.

To tell the story of this engine, I have to first explain that my son-in-law and I have been going to Mount Pleasant, Iowa, for the past seven years for the gas engine show.

We would listen to the engines run and talk to the owners about how they found them, what to look for, and the big thing – how much they cost. There are a lot of engines out there, all sizes and shapes. This is something that amazed me, as we were looking at engines made at the turn of the century.

d46-stamp
"D46" is cast into the connecting rod, indicating a 7hp engine.

Each manufacturer had their own design, with different castings, ignitions, flywheels and so on. Last year, I saw an engine at a show. We talked to the owner and found out it was in good condition. It had been restored about 10 years ago. There was no name tag or identification on it to show who manufactured it. I’m sure the cart wasn’t original, but it worked fine to move it around. The owner thought it must be a 4hp engine.



rocker-arm
Unlike a Waterloo, the Miller's rocker arm sits at an angle.



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