SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Steam and Gas Engine Association's


| November/December 1975



Waterloo Threshing Machine Company

Courtesy of H.H. Orser, 10931-82 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5H 1L7

H.H. Orser

15th Annual Show

15700 Santini Road, Burtonsville, Maryland 20730

Sawmill in operation. All at the Show drive Massey-Harris gets ready for the parade; on display comes through the parade. Note motor in the center of the wheel. held in Berry ville, Virginia.

I will attempt to write up a report of the Shenandoah Valley Show for GAS ENGINE MAGAZINE, although I am a steam engine man with not to much experience with the old gas engines and tractors. My experience with them, despite the fact that I am only 42, is limited to model A Fords, a couple of old trucks, a pair of 10-20's and a 22-36 McCormick-Deering. However, I will attempt to report on the whole show with the emphasis on 'Gasoline', or 'Bang-put-put' Alley. For the benefit of those who do not take the IRON-MEN ALBUM I will try to cover it all in general. As most of you know we have our show at the grounds of the Ruitan Club in Berry ville, Va. There we have a good grandstand, restrooms, many buildings, and enough huge shade trees to park all our exhibits in the shade. This also leaves enough room for operating the engines and tractors in the shade. Only our sawmill, shingle mill, and thresher are out in the sun all the time. There is also adequate ground for parking for the crowd.

We had pretty much the same names in steam, Frick, Case, Russell, Geiser, Farquhar, and Aultman-Taylor. The size of our steam engines varied from Joe Newton's 10 hp. bevel gear A&T to Ralph Lewin's 30 hp. double cylinder Geiser ZZ. We had single and double cylinder Frick and Geiser, portables, and homemade engines, some made from scratch and others from portables. Of course, sawmill, shingle mill, thresher and a small rock crusher were in use from time to time each day. Mr. and Mrs. Schaefer were there with their books, magazine subscriptions, and souvenirs. Our membership booth and souvenirs stand was also doing business as usual. We also had our steam train ride, model table and on Sunday, the steam calliope. Our flea market was the biggest ever and our foundry and blacksmith were both there. The helicopter was back giving rides over the show grounds and the area.

We were blessed by wonderful weather for the entire show. Many of our neighboring shows have had rain for at least part of the show, with one having a total flood that just about stopped everything. As I write this we have one more show to go in the area, and I hope them the best of luck. After having had such good weather in the midst of the bad luck of so many others, our bad days are bound to come. Our crowds were by far the largest ever, and I think this is a sign of growing popularity as much as the good weather.

A threshing picture in the late 1920s. I was a service man for the Waterloo Threshing Machine Company at that time. We were called exports at that time. It is a Rock Island tractor and Waterloo Separator threshing at Sedgwick, Alberta Canada.