ENGINES IN SCANDINAVIA


| June/July 1987



Munktells steam traction engine

Photo 1

Rubens Maskinhistoriska Samlingar Lars Olofs Gard 7007, S-533 00 Gotene Sweden

This is a report of the engine hobby in Scandinavia, which has not yet caught on on a large scale. There are vintage car exhibitions, but our part of the collecting and restoring hobby has yet to blossom. Usually a single oil engine or tractor is about all one finds at a show. In the early '80s, an international meeting was arranged in Denmark, and in Sweden, several attempts have been made to add steam and oil engines {c} old car rallies, but these have {c} with limited success.

While Scandinavians would be interested in seeing engine displays, I feel that collectors and restorers do not yet have engines ready for display. Also, travel distances and transport costs are another factor adversely affecting the displaying of engines at shows.

However, the Rubens Historical Machinery Collection is helping to fill the void by providing for the public working demonstrations of steam and oil engines on the Sundays during July. We are also working on the idea of a 'baby rally'.

Shown here are photos from the collection. Photo 1 and 2 are of the Munktells steam traction engine no. 5605, 1914, klass SK6. This engine is the sole survivor of the largest type of traction engine made by the Swedish firm Munktells (which is now the M in Volvo BM). Although made in 1914, it was not sold before 1919, due to a very limited market for this 10 HP engine. Only 18 were made between 1912 and 1914 and the last six in the series were hard to sell.

This engine was bought by a traveling contractor in the wood sawing and threshing business and replaced a smaller Munktells engine. When the area in which it was working became electrified in the '30s, the engine was sold for the same sort of work further south. In 1955, it was bricked in concrete and semi-fixed in a small sawmill. It looked like a portable in this state. The engine was bought for the Rubens collection by my father, Ruben Blom in 1969, under the agreement that the owner could use it as long as he wanted (he was then 82 years old).