Butterfield Show


| November/December 1975



Men who showed their engines

Men who showed their engines during the first years of the show - John Pankratz, Elving and Torger Sul-heim, Ed Streich, Harvey Wahl - have been joined by many more during the years, and now they come from Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin and even Illinois to show

If anything increases in number - besides visitors - each year it's got to be the gas engine exhibit. With the growth of the Butterfield show, word that exhibitors can sit in cool shade and run their engines, it seems only natural that the men who tinker in their workshops all year on gas engine? should show them here.

You can't miss the gas engines, their familiar chugging, nor the friendliness of the exhibitors who love nothing better that to answer questions about their prizes. Men who showed their engines during the first years of the show - John Pankratz, Elving and Torger Sul-heim, Ed Streich, Harvey Wahl - have been joined by many more during the years, and now they come from Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin and even Illinois to show.

The gas engine, of course, provided the farmer with his first real chance to harness energy to do his many backbreaking chores, and you'll be able to see how the engines developed from early prototypes to the more sophisticated just before electricity hit the prairie. And you'll be amazed at the names, the numbers of engines that came out of workshops all over the country. Luckily, many have been preserved by our exhibitors as a reflection of our quest for improving rural life.

Butterfield's 'gas engine alley' is Harvey Wahl's Flour City engine, a 10 hp beauty that weighs 3,300 pounds.

A new addition to Butterfield's 'gas engine alley' is Harvey Wahl's Flour City engine, a 10 hp beauty that weighs 3,300 pounds. Wahl bought the engine at a Valley Springs, S. D. auction and with his son, spent many hours of restoration for the 1975 show.