SOME OF MY BUYS


| November/December 1971

  • Famous International Engine
    Courtesy of Allan Hein, 8229 Bronco Lane San Antonio, Texas 78227.
    Allan Hein
  • Collection of Hungerford
    Courtesy of Allan Hein, 8229 Bronco Lane, San Antonio, Texas 78227.
    Allan Hein
  • Collection of Hungerford
    Courtesy of Allan Hein, 8229 Bronco Lane, San Antonio, Texas 78227.
    Allan Hein
  • Engine
    Courtesy of Richard D. Hamp, 1772 Conrad Avenue, San Joe, California 95121.
    Richard D. Hamp
  • Miami Engine
    Courtesy of Allan Hein, 8229 Bronco Lane, San Antonio, Texas 78227.
    Allan Hein
  • Gray Engine
    Courtesy of C. R. Johnson, 411 W. Moseley St., Freeport, Illinois 61032
    C. R. Johnson
  • Dempster engine
    Courtesy of Roger L. Eshelman, Box 63, College Springs, Iowa 51637.
    Roger L. Eshelman

  • Famous International Engine
  • Collection of Hungerford
  • Collection of Hungerford
  • Engine
  • Miami Engine
  • Gray Engine
  • Dempster engine

8229 Bronco Lane, San Antonio, Texas 78227

I have been reading GEM for about 4 years and have decided that it is about time that I wrote a story of my own.

It all started the summer of 1967 when I was given a 1? HP Stover by my then future father-in-law. I worked most of the summer in my spare time painting and restoring it. This led to many miles of engine hunting in four surrounding states.

In August 1967 I went on a vacation to South Dakota where I found my second engine. It was a 3 HP verticle International. After getting it home I had about 5 days to get it running before the 2nd annual Cedar Valley Engine Show. I did get it running in time for the show.



At this time I was beginning my second year at Clinton Community College at Clinton, Iowa. I searched the surrounding area, but only bought 2 or 3 engines. I then transferred to Stout State University at Menomonie, Wisconsin. While in Wisconsin I bought several engines and tried to buy a lot more. The first engine I bought was a 1? HP Wolverine built by Field and Brundage.

One engine that I think is very rare is a Miami, built by Middletown Machine Co., Middletown, Ohio, which I bought near Menomonie. I originally thought it was a Woodpecker because of the picture of a woodpecker on page 13 of Nov.-Dec. 1968 issue of GEM. It is very similar to that engine except that the exhaust valve is placed on the side of the engine and operated directly by a push rod instead of using a rocker arm. There are a number of things that are unique about the engine. 1. The main and rod bearings are oiled instead of greased. 2. This engine has 5 spoked flywheels. 3. The carburetor is gravity fed and the gas tank is mounted on the water hopper above the carburetor.