'AS I SEE IT'


| May/June 1970



Sandwich Engine

Courtesy of Roger L. Eshelman, Box 63, College Springs, Iowa 51637

Roger L. Eshelman

1615 San Francisco St. San Antonio, Texas 78201

One thing I've always liked about GEM, and the IRON-MEN ALBUM, is that Editor-Publisher Elmer L. Ritzman, and his fine staff, use a few worth-while words of praise for Jesus Christ, Christianity, and Christmas. First, let me state my entire story, refers to the Jan.-Feb. 1970 issue of GEM. So, in that issue, on page 2, in the SMOKE RINGS Column, by Anna Mae, I'll quote a portion that Anna Mae wrote: '. . .so one thing I'll say -- its' as usual -- harried, bustling, busy, and a BEAUTIFUL time of the year. Just think -- what else is as important as the birth of JESUS?' Yes, TODAY is the time to accept Jesus whole-heartedly; tomorrow may be too late! Anna Mae is right, with those words of wisdom! And, as a Christian-nation, we should not be quality of saying, 'glad THAT'S over (Christmas)'!, we're to live close to our Savior all throughout the year, not just Christmas-day.

A good portion of GEM readers, I feel, realize there are now many, many young boys (and some girls, too) and also some of the more mature men (and women, too), who have had only little gas & oil engine and tractor experience previously, who are now eagerly reading GEM and trying to gain as much engine & tractor knowledge as fast as they now can; thus getting started in this do-it-their self hobby, trying to catch up with many of us older, more experienced, fellows and many are doing a real job, too. That's as I see it, and I do believe some do get confused at times, at the differing reports they hear or read about on one specific unit of early-day equipment, now and then. I might note errors at a glance, while the younger and less-experienced may begin to wonder when two or three different versions are given on that particular machine, come to their attention. That's why I like to correct, or help correct, some of the instances that come up; if they are a little off-color, especially if I know something about it. Remember, I only know a small percentage of the business; the greater percentage of the business, the hardest part, I wish I could still learn. In this light, I am not reflecting on anyone's inexperience; so just keep on expressing yourselves in the pages of GEM. From your contributions written in your own words, is where I usually learn a little more, too.

Let's look at the picture on page 12, It is not an I.H.C. engine; rather it is a FAIRBANKS-MORSE, type 'Z', style 'B', either a 5 hp. or a 7-? hp. If a 7-? hp., which I surely believe it is, it will weigh about 900 lbs. The trailer and engine, together, would hardly weigh a ton, unless the trailer is extra-heavily-built. Anyway, as the wording goes (page 12) the weight applies to the engine, as I see it. This F-M engine has 5-3/4 x 8 inch cylinder, and rated at 550 rpm.

The lower right-hand picture, on page 26, shows an engine with the bluted-cooler. The engine's name should be corrected to AERMOTOR. It was built by the AERMOTOR CO., Chicago, builders of the famous AERMOTOR wind-mills.

On this 1? hp. Sandwich engine, the block, water hopper, crankcase and crank-case cover are all cast in one piece. I found this one in a barn. It is missing the cranking handle in the flywheel. It runs good.