REFLECTIONS

A Brief Word

| November/December 1998

  • Unidentified Engine
    33/11/5B
    Herb Mann
  • Robert is ye olde Reflector, Roland Porten'
    Tour photo # 1
  • Unidentified Engine
    33/11/5C
    Herb Mann
  • F-M Mixer Engine
    33/11/12
    Robert Rowe
  • Unidentified Engines
    33/11/7B
    Bud Edwards
  • Unidentified Engines
    33/11/7 A
    Bud Edwards
  • Burrell Engine
    33/11/13
    Carl Blackwell
  • Grinder with steel burrs
    33/11/17
    H. Day Company
  • Unidentified Engine
    33/11/19
    Charlie Roncelli
  • Photo is my neighbor
    Tour photo #2
  • Vertical atmospheric engine
    Tour photo #4
  • Unidentified Engine
    33/11/1A
    Neville Botha
  • Various engines
    Tour photo #5
  • The engine collection at the Deutsches Museum
    Tour photo #3
  • Unidentified Engine
    33/11/1B
    Neville Botha
  • Unidentified Engine
    33/11/5A
    Herb Mann
  • Universal Lighting Plant Engine
    33/11/2
    Bill Ewoldt

  • Unidentified Engine
  • Robert is ye olde Reflector, Roland Porten'
  • Unidentified Engine
  • F-M Mixer Engine
  • Unidentified Engines
  • Unidentified Engines
  • Burrell Engine
  • Grinder with steel burrs
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Photo is my neighbor
  • Vertical atmospheric engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Various engines
  • The engine collection at the Deutsches Museum
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Universal Lighting Plant Engine

After a month away from this column, we return with news of our recent tour of Europe. Our tour started off with a stop at Roland Porten's collection at the Alp Hof near Sthlingen, Germany. We visited Roland's magnificent tractor collection, and that evening we had a sumptuous dinner at his Hotel Rebstock Restaurant.

Then it was off toward Garmisch and the Hotel Obermhle. From there we took off for Munich and the world-famous Deutsches Museum. Although some folks opted for seeing some of Munich for the day, many of us spent our entire day at the museum, and at that, we saw only parts of it.

The Austrian National Threshing Machine Museum was quite interesting, and is home to a substantial number of machines. Afterward we enjoyed some local hospitality with these folks, consisting primarily of beer and schnapps.

Various other stops along the way demonstrated some nice engines and tractors. However, when traveling in this part of the world, vintage machines are not very plentiful; the ravages of war have eliminated most of the old machinery. Thus, it is hard to find any sizable collections. For the most part, machinery that was actually being used during World War Two escaped meltdown, while most idle equipment was forged into machinery of war.



Without a doubt, the most impressive display of old engines and tractors was at Wim van Schayik at Langen-boom, Holland. The restorations were amazing, and his new museum building is a sight to behold. In addition, the van Schayik family hosted us to a social hour before going into the museum, and that evening they were on hand for a grand dinner celebration.

The H.M.T. Show near Eindhoven is a bit difficult to describe. There were about 1,300 tractors on hand, plus about 350 engines. The Lanz Bulldog and its clones were in abundance, with many different styles being present. There were some very nice engines on hand, including a very rare 2 HP Stover Vertical owned by L. &. H. Terpstra at Lanhuisterweg 45, 9076 PL Annaparochie, Holland.