REFLECTIONS

A Brief Word

| March/April 1997

  • Old Tool
    32/3/2
    Harry Butler
  • Fox Marine Engine
    32/3/11B
    Glen Gerlach
  • Fox Marine Engine
    32/3/11A
    Glen Gerlach
  • Unidentified Engine
    32/3/9C
    Eugene DeCamp
  • New Way Engines
    32/3/15
    Dick Hamp
  • Corn Shellers
    32/3/14
    Thomas Kruse
  • Gray Engine
    32/3/17A
    John O'Leary
  • Gray Engine
    32/3/17B
    John O'Leary
  • Small crawler
    32/3/23
  • Clinton Generator
    32/3/21
    Michael E. Schultz
  • Cylinder
    32/3/25B Cylinder on its side. Note that top left side shows cam followers and sideshaft bearing support which is cast as part of the head.
    Charles Franklin
  • Connecting Rod

    Charles Franklin
  • Marine Engine
    32/3/6A
    Dale Boss
  • Cylinder
    32/3/25F The cylinder showing the valve gear upside down as determined by the location of the piston/cylinder oil hole from oiler which can be seen in photo 25E.
    Charles Franklin
  • Sideshaft
    32/3/25C Poor quality photo of the sideshaft support and valve rocker arms.
    Charles Franklin
  • Heavy flywheel
    32/3/25D Heavy flywheel and chain drive ratchet sprocket (the only part that is free).
    Charles Franklin
  • Cylinder
    32/3/25E The cylinder standing on end for soaking; the flywheel is off a Hubbard which is being restored.
    Charles Franklin
  • Unidentified Engine
    32/3/28B
    Michael E. Schultz
  • Engine
    32/3/28C
    Michael E. Schultz
  • Unidentified Engine
    32/3/28 A
    Michael E. Schultz
  • Cauffiel Clipper engines
    32/3/28D
    Michael E. Schultz
  • Old engine
    32/3/34
    Fred A. Hodge
  • Marine Engine
    32/3/6B
    Dale Boss
  • Tractor
    32/3/37A
    Robert Lathrop
  • Waterloo Boy
    32/3/39A
    Dennis L. Buswell
  • John Deere
    32/3/36
  • Engine

    Robert Lathrop
  • Worthington Engine
    32/3/41
    William Ahner
  • Burr Mill
    32/3/39C
    Dennis L. Buswell
  • Waterloo Boy
    32/3/39B
    Dennis L. Buswell
  • 5 HP Jacob Haisch Chanticleer engine
    MM1
  • A-C Rock Crusher
    32/3/43
    Jim Moffett
  • M from the 7 Mountains kit
    MM2
  • Detroit Stationary
    32/3/7A
    Andrew K. Mackey
  • Pump and pump jack
    MM3
  • Marvin and Margit Hedberg
    MM4
  • Detroit Stationary
    32/3/7B
    Andrew K. Mackey
  • Detroit marine engine
    32/3/71D
    Andrew K. Mackey
  • Detroit marine engine
    32/3/7C
    Andrew K. Mackey
  • Unidentified Engine
    32/3/9A
    Eugene DeCamp
  • Unidentified Engine
    32/3/9B
    Eugene DeCamp

  • Old Tool
  • Fox Marine Engine
  • Fox Marine Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • New Way Engines
  • Corn Shellers
  • Gray Engine
  • Gray Engine
  • Small crawler
  • Clinton Generator
  • Cylinder
  • Connecting Rod
  • Marine Engine
  • Cylinder
  • Sideshaft
  • Heavy flywheel
  • Cylinder
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Cauffiel Clipper engines
  • Old engine
  • Marine Engine
  • Tractor
  • Waterloo Boy
  • John Deere
  • Engine
  • Worthington Engine
  • Burr Mill
  • Waterloo Boy
  • 5 HP Jacob Haisch Chanticleer engine
  • A-C Rock Crusher
  • M from the 7 Mountains kit
  • Detroit Stationary
  • Pump and pump jack
  • Marvin and Margit Hedberg
  • Detroit Stationary
  • Detroit marine engine
  • Detroit marine engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine

After enjoying a very nice Christmas Holiday, along comes January 7, our customary deadline for this month's column. Even after writing this column for quite a few years, the 7th day of the month seems to come up very quickly, and quite unannounced that is, unless we miss our deadline and get a pleading call from the home office at Lancaster. We must confess that one month last fall, the 7th came and went without our even thinking about it. In order to keep things on schedule with mechanicals, printing, and mailing, that required us to get busy and burn the midnight oil. However, we admit that we enjoy putting all your mail in a stack and then going through each letter. Hopefully, we can continue for some time to come with this forum.

As a reminder to older subscribers and as a bit of information for the newer ones, this column is intended solely as an informational forum. We don't have all the answers to your questions, and the truth is that even after 25 years of study, plus 30-some books on engines and tractors, we are continually amazed at the new discoveries and new information that appears. Many times we call upon other readers for answers, and in the vast majority of the questions, someone has some data or some. answers.

A new subscriber recently wrote us asking how to go about lining up the belt for a small engine to another machine, such as a corn sheller. At first we were taken aback, since this writer has been doing this sort of thing from a kid onward. In fact, it was with considerable pride that we could unhook from the threshing machine, make a loop with the tractor, and be lined up the first shot. That bit of nearly useless information aside, we thought about the letter we received, and it dawned on us that lots of people of our time were never around this equipment, never operated it, and perhaps never saw any of it until becoming interested in our hobby. Then we started to put our thoughts on paper, and we found it challenging to pass along something that we've always taken for granted. Here's our stab at it:

 In aligning anything, it's a given that the two shafts, that of the engine and that of the driven machine have to be parallel. We always called this 'squaring up' or 'lining up.' With a good eye and a bit of experience, it's relatively easy to roll out the drivebelt square to the driven machine. Then all that's necessary is to square up the engine or tractor to the drivebelt. If the belt is running in or out on the drive pulley, shifting the front end of the machine one way or another usually will suffice. Of course it is essential that the driven machine be staked down so that it can't shift or move. This usually doesn't require a whole lot, especially on a small corn sheller or feed grinder.



With a tractor, backing into the belt, getting it tight, and setting the brake is all that's required. Steam engines and a few tractors require someone to drop a block in front of the pulley side drive-wheel when the belt is tight. Gas engines, especially the larger ones, are a bit different.

For small engines, driving a stake and using a small cable comealong to tighten the belt is probably the easiest way. It will still be necessary to drive a stake or two alongside the truck wheels to keep the engine from shifting out of position.



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