REFLECTIONS

Modelmakers Corner

| June/July 1993

  • Inverted engine model
    MM-1
    Earl Rains
  • Engines
    MM-10
  • 1/3 scale Galloway 5 HP engine
    MM-2
    Mike Moyers
  • Main bearings are old furnace blower bearings
    MM-6
    Ernest T. Werner
  • Oscillating steam engine
    MM-4
    Ernest T. Werner
  • Quadrant, whistle, pop off, and gauge'
    MM-5
    Ernest T. Werner
  • Stuart #7 engine
    MM-3
    Ernest T. Werner
  • Original Homemade Magic Marble Machine
    MM-7
    Ernest T. Werner
  • Die cast cylinder
    MM-8
    Ernest T. Werner
  • Viktor Vali
    MM-9
    Tom Whitmire

  • Inverted engine model
  • Engines
  • 1/3 scale Galloway 5 HP engine
  • Main bearings are old furnace blower bearings
  • Oscillating steam engine
  • Quadrant, whistle, pop off, and gauge'
  • Stuart #7 engine
  • Original Homemade Magic Marble Machine
  • Die cast cylinder
  • Viktor Vali

We're happy to include some work from several modelmakers this month. In the following paragraphs we also include, virtually verbatim, a letter from Mr. Howard R. Schultz, 520 E. Wausau Ave., Wausau, WI 54401. In his letter Mr. Schultz is critical of some of the kits and the accompanying drawings now available. While this column is not intended as a place to vent one's spleen, we hope that aspiring kit makers will bear in mind that many of the model-makers are amateur machinists. By comparison, Mr. Schultz is a tool and die maker of fifty years standing, and has operated his own shop for 36 years. Mr Schultz writes:

I have been following the 'Model Makers Corner' in GEM. In the last three issues you wonder what has happened to the model input. Maybe my experiences will help you to understand what may contribute to the lack of [modelmaking] articles.

Some of the problems are poor castings, casting dimensions not close to the print, missing and/or wrong dimensions, mating parts that will not assemble if made to print, and prints dated twenty years ago, with dates not corrected.

Some of these models are sold as finished and running, but poorly made.



I asked one supplier if their finished items were made from the same prints they sell. When [they replied in the affirmative] they became angry when I [disagreed].

It becomes not a challenge, but disgusting when each and every hole, pin fit, bolt length, gear clearance, etc. has to be cross-checked with every other mating part before you take a cut or bore a hole. Better yet, find no dimension at all.