REFLECTIONS

A Brief Word


| July/August 1995



Lauson engine

30/7/10B

Donald P. Weldele

Although we're writing this copy in early May, it won't be in your hands until early June. By then, the Show Season will be under way, and once again we make our usual caveat to urge care and caution when displaying your engines and tractors.

We're told of one show that will be moving after this year, since the owner of the real estate is concerned about liability. Not only are there concerns about the safety of the equipment where the public is involved, there are also concerns about open gasoline cans and the like.

We think that exhibitors could do a lot toward making their show areas safer by setting those fuel cans back out of view, and being sure that the caps are in place. For instance, what might happen if some reckless public citizen walks by and flicks a lighted cigarette butt toward an open fuel can? We also think it wise for exhibitors to do all they can regarding safety before some of these minor things become issues. In our society, there seem to be those who are all too ready to find even the flimsiest excuse for a lawsuit. So, we again urge all of you to keep folks from any excuse to make life unpleasant.

The registration for the GAS ENGINE TOUR in September has been so overwhelming that Wade Farm Tours can no longer find air and hotel accommodations! We hope we aren't disappointing anyone, but there is nothing we can do about the situation. Right now it looks like we'll have an entourage of about 100 people, and to put it mildly, we're completely delighted!

We reported last month that we've completed our American Gas Engine Trademarks book for Stemgas Publishing, and they will have it ready sometime this summer. There are hundreds of trademarks, all taken from the pages of the Patent Office Gazette. In addition, we've compiled a gigantic listing of engine manufacturers and model names. These have been extracted over the past twenty-five years from many different sources. This data was originally on index cards, but a simple little $35 database made all this information readily available. There are three different indexes in this book (each with about 2,700 listings), and of course, one is on the trade names. Another listing puts companies in alphabetical order, followed by the trade names of their engines. The third listing is by states, and now it's easy to find all the companies that built engines in Oil City, Pennsylvania, for example. It was an enjoyable book to assemble, although we'll admit that those days and days of work at the computer required frequent stops at the coffee pot.

We're also happy to report that we're just in the beginning stages of a rather large book entitled, Encyclopedia of American Farm Implements, to be published by Stemgas. We've wanted to do a book like this for a long time, and will be working on it during the next few months. With luck, it will be ready about a year from now. The history of farm implement development has seldom been addressed in any depth, and although a detailed study would require a dozen books, we hope to present a comprehensive look at the machines that reshaped farming methods and farming practices.