Reflections

Looking for Clues to Unknown Engines


| January/February 2002



Scientific engine

37/1/1A

A Brief Word

We are writing this copy in early November, and of course by the time you see it, we will be approaching Christmas. For us 'flatlanders' out here in Ioway, that means we are in the season for cold weather, snow and ice. This year, ye olde Reflector finally smartened up a little. We decided which engines we want to work on this winter, and already have them in the shop. That makes a lot more sense than trying to move them in the snow and cold! In fact, we've got several choices this winter - a nice 6 HP ZC Fairbanks with generator flywheels, a 5 HP Hallett diesel (fairly scarce), and a beautiful 6 HP Lister diesel. Then there's a Bamford 6 HP diesel, just in case we run out of things to do.

We acquired the Hallett a few years ago. This engine never did a day's work and is in pristine condition. We look forward to mounting it on trucks and getting it ready to show. The Lister needs only minor work prior to repainting, etc. A few years ago it got a new sleeve and piston, along with some other work, so it runs very nicely. Oh yeah, then there's the Model 31 Linotype we just bought. A few of you are familiar with these machines, and most of you know by now that ye olde Reflector is also into old-time letterpress printing. Anyway, we bought the Model 31 really cheap, but the poor thing has sat for years and has lots of rust, crud and bird manure (plus even a few feathers), so it will be an interesting challenge getting it back into condition. That should be more than enough to keep us busy during the cold winter months!

Plans still keep moving forward on a tour to Germany and Switzerland for next July (see our advertisement elsewhere in this issue). We've already made some changes that will enhance the tour, and hopefully some of you folks will be inclined to board an aircraft once again. We're even hoping to include one of those 'Knight's Dinners' that go back to ancient times. There are no forks - you eat with your hands just like they did in the Middle Ages! We realize that has nothing at all to do with engines and/or tractors, but it seems like a fun thing to do, if only once.

Our first inquiry this month is:

37/1/1:Foos Mfg. Company Q: See the photos of a Scientific engine from The Foos Mfg. Co., Springfield, Ohio. It is style 300, size 10. I have been told that neither Foos Mfg. Co. nor the Foos Gasoline Engine Co. actually built this engine, but that perhaps it was built by Bauroth. There are missing parts, but I have restored the engine to run with a spark plug. If anyone can provide any information about this engine, I would like to hear from them. Also, I would like to hear from any other owners of the Scientific engines. You may write to me, but since I am totally blind I would prefer if I could talk to you. You can call me at (845) 855-9026. Tim Casson, 63 River Road, Pawling, NY 12564

A: We've never found much information on Bauroth, but this could be a possibility. Foos Mfg. Co. was established in 1878. A 1905 listing indicates that Scientific feed mills and other machinery was available from this firm. However, a very poor illustration shows a vertical engine. Can anyone supply further information on the engine shown here?