REFLECTIONS

A Brief Word

| February/March 1994

  • Sembower engine
    29/2/3
    Allied Motor
  • Stover vertical engine
    29/2/11B
    Louis Bari
  • Corn Sheller
    29/2/17A
    Jay W. Moore
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/2/14
    Virgil Scherzberg
  • Corn Sheller
    29/2/17B
    Jay W. Moore
  • Ray Motor
    29/2/13
    Clark Whiteleather
  • Corn Sheller
    29/2/17C
    Jay W. Moore
  • Success' engine
    29/2/18A
    Craig L
  • Success' engine
    29/2/18B
    Craig L
  • Gray Marine Motor
    29/2/5A
    Ron Duly
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/2/19A
    V.G. Sleepy Avant
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/2/19B
    V.G. Sleepy Avant
  • Steel-Cleated Gear Reduction Wheels
    29/2/21A
    Rodney Scholz
  • Steel-Cleated Gear Reduction Wheels
    29/2/21B
    Rodney Scholz
  • Gardner Engine
    29/2/22A
    Tim Keenan
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/2/23A
    Lewis Rd., Port Angeles
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/2/23B
    Lewis Rd., Port Angeles
  • 3 HP, Model T'
    29/2/24
    Robert G. Long
  • Gardner Engine
    29/2/22B
    Tim Keenan
  • Matthews Engineering Company
    29/2/28A
    Anton vander Cruijsen
  • Mystery Engine
    29/2/25
    T. J. Shipman
  • Gray Marine Motor
    29/2/5B
    Ron Duly
  • Matthews Engineering Company
    29/2/28B
    Anton vander Cruijsen
  • Matthews Engineering Company
    29/2/28C
    Anton vander Cruijsen
  • Mule Team engine
    29/2/35B
    Kent Zobel
  • Mule Team engine
    29/2/35A
    Kent Zobel
  • Mule Team engine
    29/2/35C
    Kent Zobel
  • Gray Marine Motor
    29/2/5C
    Ron Duly
  • Gray Marine Motor
    29/2/5D
    Ron Duly
  • Case VAIW Tractor
    29/2/7
    Robert Swanberg
  • Mercury Air-Cooled Engine
    29/2/10A
    Henry Lupkes
  • Mercury Air-Cooled Engine
    29/2/10B
    Henry Lupkes
  • Stover vertical engine
    29/2/11A
    Louis Bari

  • Sembower engine
  • Stover vertical engine
  • Corn Sheller
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Corn Sheller
  • Ray Motor
  • Corn Sheller
  • Success' engine
  • Success' engine
  • Gray Marine Motor
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Steel-Cleated Gear Reduction Wheels
  • Steel-Cleated Gear Reduction Wheels
  • Gardner Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • 3 HP, Model T'
  • Gardner Engine
  • Matthews Engineering Company
  • Mystery Engine
  • Gray Marine Motor
  • Matthews Engineering Company
  • Matthews Engineering Company
  • Mule Team engine
  • Mule Team engine
  • Mule Team engine
  • Gray Marine Motor
  • Gray Marine Motor
  • Case VAIW Tractor
  • Mercury Air-Cooled Engine
  • Mercury Air-Cooled Engine
  • Stover vertical engine

First of all, we wish to thank the many folks who sent Best Wishes to us for the Holiday Season. We hope that 1994 will be the best year ever for each one of you!

Isn't it interesting that the development of the internal combustion engine is so closely tied to many different aspects of our everyday life? Americans are notably mobile, and this great mobility is due in large part to the fact that we can get in the car in the morning and easily drive 300 miles that day . . . with a lot of ambition we can go 500 or more miles from our starting point in a single day.

Isn't it interesting that due to the internal combustion engine, virtually all of today's transportation system hinges around the internal combustion engine ? The food we eat, the clothes we wear, and in fact, virtually everything we see, smell, or touch, has in some way or other come to us through gasoline or diesel engines.

Isn't it interesting that the four-cycle engine has only been in existence for a little more than a century, and that the gasoline engine has existed for a bit less than a century? Yet in that time, all of the industrialized world has been trans-formed, largely because of this invention.



Isn't it interesting that despite the enormous dimensions and the tremendous dynamics presented by the internal combustion engine, relatively few people have any idea of how the gas engine developed, and how it has evolved from our precious collectible engines into the highly sophisticated engines of today?

Isn't it interesting that there has never been a U.S. postage stamp issued to commemorate this great invention? Isn't it interesting that most school children have little or no idea of the origins of an invention that takes them to school every day and delivers them home in the afternoon?!