EFLECTIONS

A Brief Word

| November/December 1994

  • Trademark

  • Sears Corn Sheller
    29/11/5B
    Marion Hardisty
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/10A
    Ronnie Halbert
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/10B
    Ronnie Halbert
  • Unidentified Mill
    29/11/17/A
    David Brown
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/18A
    Ed Bruce
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/18B
    Ed Bruce
  • Unidentified Mill
    29/11/17B
    David Brown
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/19B
    Leo R. Korb
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/19C
    Leo R. Korb
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/19A
    Leo R. Korb
  • Eagle trademark

  • Blacksmith Drill
    29/11/20A
    David Nicholls
  • Blacksmith Drill
    29/11/20B
    David Nicholls
  • Essex Engine
    29/11/21
    Melvin Watson
  • Leader Engine

    Paul R. Bell
  • Leader Engine
    29/11/22B
    Paul R. Bell
  • Trademark

  • Trademark

  • Fairbanks-Morse
    29/11/4A
    Ron Konen
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/2A
    Wellford Buchanan
  • Unidentified Engine
    29/11/2B
    Wellford Buchanan
  • Fairbanks-Morse
    29/11/4B
    Ron Konen
  • Sears Corn Sheller
    29/11/5 A
    Marion Hardisty

  • Trademark
  • Sears Corn Sheller
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Mill
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Mill
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Eagle trademark
  • Blacksmith Drill
  • Blacksmith Drill
  • Essex Engine
  • Leader Engine
  • Leader Engine
  • Trademark
  • Trademark
  • Fairbanks-Morse
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Unidentified Engine
  • Fairbanks-Morse
  • Sears Corn Sheller

Continuing our discussion of last month on trademarks, we illustrate here the Cushman trademark that was claimed from 1936 for the famous Cushman motor scooters and its components. From all appearances, the company recognized the decline of their stationary engine business and had already opted for this new endeavor in the 1930s. Another mark is that of the Tiny Tim, a small generator unit for lighting or battery chargers. The Tiny Tim was built by Continental Motors at Detroit, Michigan. The company claimed first use in 1936, and this would likely be the time when the Tiny Tim saw first light.

Sometimes we've heard it asked as to when the Dixie magnetos first came into being. According to their trademark, the Dixie came along about 1913, as shown by their trademark.

A final note about the Case Eagle trademark. Herewith is the Case Eagle, as applied to grain drills and harrows. Apparently, J. I. Case got into these lines during 1928; at least this was the first use of the Eagle trademark on these implements. Oftentimes it is claimed that the Eagle trademark goes back to the 1860s, and has been used in various forms since that time. However, it is worthy of note that the earliest of the registered Eagle trademarks claims' first use in 1880; somewhat later than legend has it. Undoubtedly, those who filed the Eagle trademark application knew exactly when it was first used, since they had to be able to defend their claim if there were others who opposed the application. Thus, we stand by our contention that this mark saw first light in 1880.

As is usual this time of year, our column is somewhat abbreviated for this issue. It is due on September 7, but since we'll just be returning from the big Mt. Pleasant Show at that time, we're doing our assembly work in mid-August. Thus, the November 1994 issue is put at a slight disadvantage, just because we find it difficult to be in two places at once!



Through the grapevine we've heard a comment that 'many of the queries into this column are never answered.' Our response is that 'Every letter to this column is answered.' The only exception is once every four or five years when someone sends in a crank letter, complete with epithets completely unsuitable for civilized company. These we refuse to dignify with a response, although the temptation is sometimes strong to do so. We try our best to be of service to everyone, and if for some reason, your letter doesn't make its way to us, kindly let us know.

Now to our first query:



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