Restoring a 1-3/4 HP Monarch, Part 4

Reclaiming its crown

| October/November 2010

  • monarch 2
    Shaping the lower front end. The nearest one is sanded and the other rough sawn.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • monarch 1
    Peter Rooke's fully restored 1-3/4 HP Monarch antique gas engine badged by Nelson Bros.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 3
    Recess cut for the spacers and the holes part drilled for the engine mounting bolts.  
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 4
    Tie rods ready for fitting.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 6
    Drip tray before being pushed fully home.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 5
    Completed skid with the fuel tank fitted.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 8
    The lined flywheel.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 9
    The lined engine block.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 7
    My paint mixing palette: Pages from a glossy magazine and lining brush.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 11
    This illustration shows the exhaust valve timing, opening at 35-40 degrees before bottom dead center.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • monarch 12
    This illustration shows the exhaust valve timing, closing at 5-10 degrees after top dead center.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • Monarch 10
    The lined crankcase.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • monarch 15
    The governor assembly.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • monarch 14
    Spark timing at 40 degrees before top dead center.
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • monarch 13
    Magneto cocked with cocking lever.  
    Photo by Peter Rooke
  • monarch 16
    Another view of Peter's fully restored 1-3/4 HP Monarch antique gas engine badged by Nelson Bros.
    Photo by Peter Rooke

  • monarch 2
  • monarch 1
  • Monarch 3
  • Monarch 4
  • Monarch 6
  • Monarch 5
  • Monarch 8
  • Monarch 9
  • Monarch 7
  • Monarch 11
  • monarch 12
  • Monarch 10
  • monarch 15
  • monarch 14
  • monarch 13
  • monarch 16

The following is Part 4 of a four-part series documenting Peter Rooke’s restoration of a 1-3/4 HP Monarch badged by Nelson Bros. Read Part 3.
 

Skid The skid for this engine is fairly simple and a copy was made from sizes taken from one seen at a local show, where the exhibitor mentioned that his cart was made to original dimensions. All that was needed were two side pieces, a couple short cross members and some tensioning bolts.

 

Fortunately there was some 4- by 2-inch soft wood in the garage, left over from a building project many years ago. The wood was of good quality being fairly dense and not like the soft rubbish that you generally get nowadays.




The two long spars were cut first, 2 inches longer than the required length of 38 inches. This was deliberate as there was more than enough to do this and it provided a safety margin in case the timber was dropped and the end damaged.


The timber was first put through the planer to clean it up and the positions of the engine mounting bolts were marked. The step in the height at the front of the engine, which was 1.250 inches lower than the main section, was marked out. When marking out, allowance had to be made for the extra inches at both ends. A piece of 3.25-inch diameter steel was found to mark out the curve where the height changed and then the surplus was sawed off. A rotary sanding drum was used to complete the curve and next, before doing anything else, the side pieces were given a quick rub with sandpaper and a coat of varnish to seal the wood while it was still clean. It is very easy to get black marks on untreated timber and it takes a lot of effort to clean it again!