The History of Ingeco Engines

Part 1 of 2: Ingeco’s history pieced together with help from early ads

| August/September 2011

  • Advertisement for Ingeco from February 1912 with a picture of their tank-cooled sideshaft engine
    Advertisement for Ingeco from February 1912 with a picture of their tank-cooled sideshaft engine.
  • Chris Jerue with his all original 1913 4 HP Ingeco Type AL
    Chris Jerue with his all original 1913 4 HP Ingeco Type AL.
  • October 1912 advertisement with a picture of the very rare hopper-cooled sideshaft
    October 1912 advertisement with a picture of the very rare hopper-cooled sideshaft.
  • Ingeco engine advertisement from August 1916 reflecting the new Worthington name
    Ingeco engine advertisement from August 1916 reflecting the new Worthington name.
  • Ingeco logo

  • December 1917 advertisement for the two-cycle engine
    December 1917 advertisement for the two-cycle engine.
  • February 1917 advertisement for Ingeco Type W engines
    February 1917 advertisement for Ingeco Type W engines.
  • September 1918 advertisement for the Type W engine
    September 1918 advertisement for the Type W engine.
  • January 1921 advertisement for Worthington’s new line of stationary engines
    January 1921 advertisement for Worthington’s new line of stationary engines.
  • Ingeco engine

  • Ingeco engine

  • Where Ingeco engines are made


  • Advertisement for Ingeco from February 1912 with a picture of their tank-cooled sideshaft engine
  • Chris Jerue with his all original 1913 4 HP Ingeco Type AL
  • October 1912 advertisement with a picture of the very rare hopper-cooled sideshaft
  • Ingeco engine advertisement from August 1916 reflecting the new Worthington name
  • Ingeco logo
  • December 1917 advertisement for the two-cycle engine
  • February 1917 advertisement for Ingeco Type W engines
  • September 1918 advertisement for the Type W engine
  • January 1921 advertisement for Worthington’s new line of stationary engines
  • Ingeco engine
  • Ingeco engine
  • Where Ingeco engines are made

The following information is what I have found out about Ingeco engines throughout my many hours of research. I hope this article helps some of you out and helps satisfy your own curiosity about Ingeco engines.

The origins of Ingeco

To start, we need a brief introduction into the International Steam Pump Co. since the International Gas Engine Co. (Ingeco) was one of their subsidiary branches.

In 1899 the International Steam Pump Co. was formed. It was made up of a number of other smaller steam pump companies including Blake & Knowles Steam Pump Works of Cambridge, Mass.; Deane Steam Pump Works of Holyoke, Mass.; Henry R. Worthington Co. of Harrison, N.J.; Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio; Snow Steam Pump Works of Buffalo, N.Y.; Holly Manufacturing Co. of Buffalo, N.Y.; Clayton Air Compressor Works of Brooklyn, N.Y.; as well as the Power and Mining Machinery Co. of Cudahy, Wis.

At the time, this accounted for 90 percent of the steam pump industry in the United States. The reports for the fiscal year ending on March 31, 1906 showed profits for the company at $2,255,312  compared with $1,617,435 in 1905, showing that the company was on the right track. As with many big companies that try to expand faster than they should, they got themselves into trouble. In 1909, the International Steam Pump Co. issued $8,500,000 in bonds to refund their debt of $4,500,000 and retire a floating indebtedness of $1,498,000 in notes. They also provided cash for the payment on a new factory, as well as improvements.



In 1910, the company’s capital stock was $39,000,000 and Mr. John Wesley Dunn was president; the company seemed to have recovered.

Ingeco engines

The International Gas Engine Co. (Ingeco), of Cudahy Wis., appeared in the gas engine community in early 1912 with a vast line of stationary engines, including pushrod style farm engines, sideshaft engines and vertical engines. The vertical and horizontal engines were available as hopper-cooled as well as tank cooled. Ingeco built a horizontal air-cooled engine as well. The diversity of fuel usage in this line of engines included gas, gasoline, oil and producer gas. The company featured horsepower ratings to fit the needs of almost anyone, including sizes from 1-1/2 to 350 horsepower.



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