19th Century Weather Vane Postage Stamps


| 2/17/2012 10:39:00 AM


Tags: march 2012, weather vanes, United States Postal Service,

19th Century Weather Vane Postage Stamps 

Dealing with limited storage space? Not feeling like Charles Atlas? Don’t have a truck and trailer? Check out smaller collectibles: You’ll find a category custom-made for you. Or you may find your niche in a broad category. Postage stamps are a great example of that. The U.S. Postal Service issued a series of first-class mail stamps depicting antique American-made weather vanes (as seen above). Other than a windmill or a barn, it’s hard to imagine a more enduring icon of rural America. Dip into the category, and you’ll find dozens of farm-related stamps from all over the world.

Here is more information from the U.S. Postal Service, along with details about the weather vanes found on the stamps:

The U.S. Postal Service has issued 45-cent Weather Vanes First-Class Mail stamps in five designs available in pressure-sensitive adhesive coils of 3,000 and 10,000. The stamps are available at Post Offices nationwide, online at usps.com and by phone at 800-782-6724.

Each of the five designs features a photograph of eye-catching 19th century weather vanes made in the United States. All the weather vanes featured are part of Shelburne Museum’s collection: a cow, an eagle, two roosters and a centaur. Sally Anderson-Bruce of New Milford, Ct., photographed the weather vanes under the art direction of Derry Noyes of Washington, D.C.

“These stamps are truly beautiful reminders of an era gone by,” said U.S. Postal Service Senior Manager, Post Office Operations Shawn Patton, while dedicating the stamps at Shelburne Museum. “We hope Americans will buy and use the stamps when communicating with friends, family and other loved ones.”