Old Iron Questions

Evansville Boy Scout Gas Engine

Boy Scout Gas Engine 

I am writing to request the help of GEM in researching information about the Evansville Gas Engine Works products. I have a 1- to 2-1/2 hp engine from this maker marked “Boy Scout.” The design of the crankcase suggests it was utilized in marine applications. C.H. Wendel’s book refers to this company and a 1929 date in the index of manufacturers. Stan Grayson also refers to this company in the 2nd edition of Old Marine Engines. Neither reference includes photos or company history.

The subject engine is 4-cycle, headless, sparkplug and coil ignition, with the camshaft used to drive the water pump, activate the exhaust valve and control ignition timing. I think it will be another valuable example of internal combustion history when restored. I’m looking for details like engine color, etc. I welcome any information or sources that might be of value.

Jim Saxon
6600 Marie Circle
Leeds, AL 35094

Jim, we’d suggest joining the Old Marine Engine Discussion board (www.oldmarineengine.com), where we found several posts on the Boy Scout engine and Evansville Gas Engine Works. As you no doubt appreciate, it is a fairly obscure engine and, as you’ve suggested, it was indeed designed for marine duty. GEM regular and Old Marine member Keith Kinney has posted several images of a 3 hp Boy Scout engine he owns online, along with an original Boy Scout pamphlet.


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

John Smyth or Economy Engine?

Marts

My dad bought this engine sometime between 1915-1920. He used it in the 1940s for various chores around the farm. The last duty was to run the clothes washer. The washer sat on the porch and the engine sat out in the yard connected with a flat belt. Sometimes my mom had trouble starting it, so she would short out the batteries with the crank, and if she saw a spark, that eliminated the ignition. The trouble is, my brother told me it was an economy, but one day a gentleman said it was not. So, I need help to identify it. The tag says “John M. Smyth MDSE Co. Chicago ILL Serial 74142 1-1/2 HP.” This engine has been in our family around 100 years. Thank you for any help you can give.

Marts

Wayner Marner
1207 Fairlane Dr.
Valparaiso, IN 46383

Wayne, your engine was made by Waterloo Gas Engine Co., Waterloo, Iowa. Waterloo made engines for a host of companies – at least 67 by some accounts – John Smyth being one of them. According to Jimmy Priestley’s Waterloo serial number list (www.majesticengine.com), your engine was built in 1913, which times out about right considering you think it was purchased around 1915 or later. – Editor


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Fairmont Type QM Help Requested

 Fairmont

I have a Fairmont Type QM 6 hp engine that belonged to my late father. I’d like to get it running again, but I know very little about it. I am hoping that you can help me. I would like to know what gasoline to use (leaded, unleaded, and what octane?), what oil to mix (regular motor oil, 2-cycle oil?) and the ratio. I believe he used a ratio of 25:1. Also, could you tell me what voltage battery to use on the coil? I would like to find some literature and/or manuals, if they exist. I appreciate any help you can offer.

Fairmont

Gene A. Trevail
Catskill, New York
owlsridge@hotmail.com

Gene, in the April 1989 issue of GEM, regular contributor Andrew Mackey noted that his Fairmont manual called for a high 12:1 ratio. Engines of that era used standard 30w or 40w engine oil and leaded fuel. You shouldn’t have any issues running unleaded for display purposes. The coil is most likely rated for 6 volts. Perhaps a reader can confirm? – Editor


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Is this a Trencher?

davidson

I’m not expecting this to get published in your magazine; I’m just curious as to what this piece of equipment is that’s been in the woods behind our house ever since we moved here almost 12 years ago – and was probably there for decades before that. The wheel says “National Drill Mfg. Co.” and other pieces have designations like G2, G4 and G10. I tried to Google the name, but couldn’t find anything. I presume it’s farm planting equipment of some kind. I’m not a farming enthusiast, so I’m not familiar with farming equipment or websites/blogs devoted to this kind of thing.

davidson

Scott Davidson
sedavidson@twc.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Vintage Negatives Show Life on the Farm

vintage

I purchased these negatives at auction. They were taken around 1915 to the early 1920s. The first one looks like a Stickney on a saw in a hog yard, and the second looks like a Novo, hooked to a small Ferris wheel under construction. I believe both were taken in southeastern South Dakota.

vintage

Dave Cross
48015 258th St.
Brandon, SD 57005
dwcross@alliancecom.net


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Remington Oil Engine Information

Remington Oil Engine

I have found a Remington oil engine in a barn. I don’t know whether to buy it to restore, or sell it as is. How rare is this engine? How much is it worth as it sits, running or restored? I saw this engine for eight years as I picked up my milk. I always loved it. Now the farm is sold, and the new owners don’t want it. I’m very excited. Any information you can give me would be awesome.

Remington Oil Engine

Taj Smoker
taj.smoker@treves-group.com
(256) 647-8140

 


 

Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Novo S Conundrum

Novo Novo

I have a conundrum I hope you can solve. I think this is an early Novo S. As you can see in the pictures, this unit has no breather tube and it also has no breather holes in the back bearing cap. It does, however, have a small breathing pipe on the backside. Also, the castings have S numbers (2S-4B, 2S-43, 2S-58X), and all the measurements indicate it is a 3 hp Novo S. I assume this was built early in the Novo S production, but every example without a breathing pipe I find on the internet, the owner claims a 1924-1926 build date. I think they are wrong; they have no serial number badge – neither do I. Can you give me a general time frame when this odd unit could have been manufactured?

Dennis Rinaldo
denerin@mailservice.ms


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com