Old Iron Questions


Schramm Compressor Info Needed

new-holland 

I’m looking for information for a Schramm compressor outfit like the one shown on Page 4 of the December/January issue. The tag on the block or the engine reads:

new-holland

Schramm Inc.

#10260 Type 10
Piston Displacement 15
cubic ft. per minute

I think the engine is a Domestic, but don’t have enough information to be sure. I’d like to get in touch with someone who has the manuals on the engine and pump – it would help a lot.

Joe Mathis
62000 E. Hwy. 137
Fairland, OK 74343
918-542-8178
pdmathis53@gmail.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Looking for K Motor Information

k-motor-1 

I have an engine that I have not been able to get any information on. There is no tag but "K Motor" is cast in the block. Engine weighs about 70 pounds, and it has a single cylinder and single flywheel. It probably is about 1/2hp with about a 3-inch piston.

A mag is connected directly to the back. Mag condenser has British, Canadian and U.S. patents of 1915 date. It is 4-stroke, water-cooled, with no governor.

k-motor-3 

There are two levers on the carburetor to adjust fuel and air. There are two spark plugs in head directly opposite each other. Whether there was an electrode and a ground originally or two plugs firing 3 inches apart, I do not know. Engine came to me from Chile. I suspect it might be British but don’t know. Any information would be appreciated.

k-motor-2

 


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Soo Line Spark Plug Information

Spark-Plug 

Reader Bob Lundberg writes in looking for information on Soo Line spark plugs. Bob writes: “The 2hp Witte that I brought to Florida from Michigan had a Soo Line spark plug. I have tried to research it, but have not found any information. It’s a 1925 engine, and in its ‘running’ days that area was served by the DSS&A Railroad. Soo Line bought the DSS&A, but long after electricity put my engine out of work. Any information from readers would be great.”

Bob Lundberg
blundberg50@gmail.com

It’s unclear what the connection was between Soo Line Railroad Co., Minneapolis, Minnesota, and the spark plug brand, although at one time Soo Line Railroad used the same logo as shown on Bob’s spark plug, a clever combination of the letters “S” and “L” producing a dollar sign. Perhaps spark plugs were simply a short-term sideline?

Editor


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Adapted 2-Cylinder Engine Designs

twin-cylinder 

I expect many of us have seen this catalog image of a 1918 Schramm compressor outfit, which used two standard hopper-cooled stationary engines linked together (likely made by Domestic, as it appears Schramm never actually produced its own engine); one as the power unit and the other converted to compressor duty. Chris D. Schramm & Son, West Chester, Pennsylvania, apparently did quite a business with these rigs, which were used in all manner of commercial and industrial applications, as one might imagine.

 schramm-compressor

Also shown is an advertisement (date unknown) for a twin-cylinder Associated engine from Associated Manufacturers Co., Waterloo, Iowa. Unlike the Schramm, the Associated engine is actually a tractor engine adapted for stationary duty; both cylinders on the Associated were power producers. I show these two engines to bring up a question, namely; how many such “adapted” engine designs were created and produced, and by what companies? Both engines represent adaptation of a design to a different use than originally intended rather than any innovation of design, and it’s that aspect that catches my attention. I’d very much like to hear from readers with examples of similar schemes, ideally accompanied by high-resolution images so we can share with readers. Editor


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Pine Tree Milking Engine

pinetree-milking 

The post in the August/September issue from Cliff Jennings about the Pine Tree milking engine prompted me to crawl into the back of one of my engine buildings and refresh my memory of what I had traded for 15 or 20 years ago. I will now drag it out and put it close to the top of my to-do list. While my decal is more readable than Cliff’s, it is not perfect by any means and I am wondering if there are any reproductions of a good one. It does show a milking bucket under the cow. The decal reads, “Cows Adopted Child.” Does anyone have manuals for this engine? Also, does anyone have plans for using a 12-volt starter and some sort of friction wheel for easier starting of flywheel engines?

Gil Mangels
Miracle of America Museum
Polson, Montana
miracleofamericamuseum.org
(406) 883-6804


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email us.

Help with Identifying “Milker” Engine

 engine-repainted
Unidentified engine, cleaned up and painted.

My name is Cliff Jennings, My father is Marlyn Jennings. He is an avid collector of hit-and-miss engines and has been for years. He has enjoyed reading your magazine for years and is looking for a bit of help. He’s 84 and doesn’t write so clearly, so he asked me to send this on to you. He is looking for any information from subscribers who might know what this engine is that he acquired a few years ago. Here is his letter he asked me to send.

original-inside
Lower section of unidentified engine as found.

Dear Gas Engine,

I’m sending you these photos of an engine I have had for some time. There is no name on it nor any serial number. The only letters are on the side of the water tank and say “Milker.” After cleaning the engine, in the crankcase I found two cylinders laying horizontally that run off a camshaft. This indicates to me that this engine was used for a vacuum pump. Any additional information anyone may have would be greatly appreciated.

original-snow
Flywheel side of engine as found.

Marlyn Jennings
River Falls, WI
(715) 425-6329


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Help with Unidentified Air-Cooled Engine

air-cooled-engine

Unidentified air-cooled engine

Bore & stroke: 3-1/2in x 5in
Flywheels: 16in x 1-3/8in
Cooling: Six cooling fins on 1-inch centers, 1-inch deep
Ignition: Likely spark plug with battery and coil
Governing: Appears to be hit-and-miss, flywheel governor
Starting: Flip-out hand crank built into flywheel
Mounting: Cast base/legs designed for wood skids
Color: Believed to have been red, or close to that


 air-cooled-engine

Flywheel Forum has always been an interesting read for me. I recently acquired an engine from Eastern Washington that I have not been able to identify. I have sent photos around to most everyone I know and no luck. Not even a guess. So, I am asking for help from your very knowledgeable readers. No name, part numbers or serial numbers have been found on the engine. It’s missing the rocker arm, pushrod and the holdout mechanism, if it had one.

air-cooled-engine

air-cooled-engine

The piston and rings and connecting rod came out clean and serviceable, and the bore can be honed. The valves were rusted beyond salvage and drilled out. The babbitt bearings are in excellent condition and can be reused. I really want to get this engine running. Hopefully, a reader will know what this engine is and how it was put together. I’m including the engine’s known specifications. Thanks for any help.

David Wirth
Walla Walla, Washington
davebobbie@charter.net
(509) 876-6478


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com







SUBSCRIBE TO GAS ENGINE MAGAZINE TODAY!

Gas Engine Magazine A_M 16Gas Engine Magazine is your best source for tractor and stationary gas engine information.  Subscribe and connect with more than 23,000 other gas engine collectors and build your knowledge, share your passion and search for parts, in the publication written by and for gas engine enthusiasts! Gas Engine Magazine brings you: restoration stories, company histories, and technical advice. Plus our Flywheel Forum column helps answer your engine inquiries!




Facebook YouTube

Classifieds


click me