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Unknown Antique Marine Engine

 antique-marine-2
Photo courtesy of Charles Wise

I was recently asked to help with the restoration of this antique marine engine that found its way down to the Chesapeake Bay from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. It appears to be a 2-stroke, three-port, dome-head monobloc jump-start engine. There are no markings or serial numbers that can be discerned anywhere on the block. The draw-over vaporizer, water pump and Essex oiler are believed to be original. Most of the ignition timing mechanism is missing. However, the spark plug (a Champion No. 34) is thought to be the original. I would appreciate any thoughts on the provenance or manufacturer of this engine.

antique-marine-1
Photo courtesy of Charles Wise

Dave Lees
neavittmanor@gmail.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Smaller Babbit Pour Spout Sizes?

babbit-1
Photo courtesy of Ray Fisher

I have an old babbit bearing pour spout for engines. It is 30 inches long and 7 inches wide at the top. It is missing the stand. Have readers seen smaller sizes?

babbit-2
Photo courtesy of Ray Fisher

Ray Fisher
(520) 861-0181
hammerblow55@gmail.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Several Questions About Unknown Engine

unknown-engine-1
Photo courtesy of Dave Lees

I bought this engine recently. I restored it and it runs beautifully. It has a 3-3/4-inch piston and battery ignition. The flywheel is 16 inches in diameter. I’d like to know if any readers know what make it is, where it was built, how old it is and about what horsepower it is.

unknown-engine-2
Photo courtesy of Dave Lees

Andy Staricka
5749 Balcony Rd.
Swanville, MN 56382

Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

 

Seeking Sieverkropp Engine Information

sieverkropp-1
Photo courtesy of Ellie Forgach.

My father, Peter Forgach, has a 1910 Sieverkropp engine. He is hoping to connect with others who may be able to provide information such as how many were manufactured in 1910 and approximate value. My father does not use email but you can email me, and I will convey any responses or you can write him directly.

sieverkropp-2
Photo courtesy of Ellie Forgach.

Ellie Forgach
ellie_forgach@urmc.rochester.edu

Peter Forgach
325 Broad St.
Eatontown, NJ 07724
(732) 542-3112


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com.

Westman Engine Piston Ring Holes

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These piston rings are out of an early Westman manufactured by Enterprise Machine Co., Minneapolis, Minnesota. They are 4-1/4 inches in diameter and 7/16-inch wide. The subject of interest are the tiny holes through the ring steps; nobody can figure out the reason for their being there. They are 0.040-inch diameter (number 60) and are drilled in all three rings. There is nothing unusual about the grooves in the piston except the locator pins being on the wrong (sealing) side.

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Also included is a photo of the Westman before it was disassembled. It was found about 40 years ago by well-known collector Jack Strand of Plano, Texas, in the basement of a summer vacation cabin on a private island on a lake in Minnesota owned by the Westman family. It had been used to pump water. The brass nameplate was removed by a grandson to make a belt buckle. Jack found the grandson (now about 75) and he was still wearing the buckle and wouldn’t part with it. Jack eventually made a soft lead pencil tracing of it and had the nameplate recast.

photo-3

 

John Burgoyne
(817) 401-0320
enginejohn101@yahoo.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

 

Evansville Boy Scout Gas Engine

Boy Scout Gas Engine 

I am writing to request the help of GEM in researching information about the Evansville Gas Engine Works products. I have a 1- to 2-1/2 hp engine from this maker marked “Boy Scout.” The design of the crankcase suggests it was utilized in marine applications. C.H. Wendel’s book refers to this company and a 1929 date in the index of manufacturers. Stan Grayson also refers to this company in the 2nd edition of Old Marine Engines. Neither reference includes photos or company history.

The subject engine is 4-cycle, headless, sparkplug and coil ignition, with the camshaft used to drive the water pump, activate the exhaust valve and control ignition timing. I think it will be another valuable example of internal combustion history when restored. I’m looking for details like engine color, etc. I welcome any information or sources that might be of value.

Jim Saxon
6600 Marie Circle
Leeds, AL 35094

Jim, we’d suggest joining the Old Marine Engine Discussion board (www.oldmarineengine.com), where we found several posts on the Boy Scout engine and Evansville Gas Engine Works. As you no doubt appreciate, it is a fairly obscure engine and, as you’ve suggested, it was indeed designed for marine duty. GEM regular and Old Marine member Keith Kinney has posted several images of a 3 hp Boy Scout engine he owns online, along with an original Boy Scout pamphlet.


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Fairmont Type QM Help Requested

 Fairmont

I have a Fairmont Type QM 6 hp engine that belonged to my late father. I’d like to get it running again, but I know very little about it. I am hoping that you can help me. I would like to know what gasoline to use (leaded, unleaded, and what octane?), what oil to mix (regular motor oil, 2-cycle oil?) and the ratio. I believe he used a ratio of 25:1. Also, could you tell me what voltage battery to use on the coil? I would like to find some literature and/or manuals, if they exist. I appreciate any help you can offer.

Fairmont

Gene A. Trevail
Catskill, New York
owlsridge@hotmail.com

Gene, in the April 1989 issue of GEM, regular contributor Andrew Mackey noted that his Fairmont manual called for a high 12:1 ratio. Engines of that era used standard 30w or 40w engine oil and leaded fuel. You shouldn’t have any issues running unleaded for display purposes. The coil is most likely rated for 6 volts. Perhaps a reader can confirm? – Editor


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com