Old Iron Questions

Shaw Du-All Walk-Behind Tractor Model Identification

Shaw Du-All

Shaw Du-All

Shaw Du-All

Reader Brandon Rasmussen is looking for information regarding a Shaw Du-All he recently acquired. Brandon writes: “I need help identifying a Shaw Du-All that has recently come into my possession. It’s a walk-behind tractor and I want to restore it back to functionality. I could really use some help in identifying the model. Any help would be greatly appreciated.” We don’t have much information on the Du-All walk-behind tractors, save for the fact they were first introduced in 1933 and used Briggs & Stratton engines. Brandon’s Du-All appears to be equipped with a Briggs Model Z, which was produced from 1931 to 1949. If anyone can help Brandon, please drop him a line.

Brandon Rasmussen
kd8ncy.br@gmail.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Seeking Information on Tiny Tim Generator

generator

generator

J.D. Schmidt sends photos of a small generator set he says he’s never seen anywhere else. The generator is a Tiny Tim. Sold by Sears, Roebuck & Co., and possibly also by Montgomery Ward, they were made by Continental Motors Corp., Muskegon, Michigan. Powered by a small 1/2 hp rope-start Continental 4-stroke engine, J.D.’s Tiny Tim is a 12-volt unit rated at 300 watts. They were apparently available in 6-volt and 32-volt versions. We don’t have any real information on them, save that they were an outgrowth of efforts to produce a small, portable generator for U.S. military use during World War II. If any readers know more, please fill us and J.D. in.

J.D. Schmidt
jdschmidt@nnmt.net


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

What Was This Hercules/John Deere Engine Used For?

engine

engine

engine

Shawn Burns’ only connection to the old engine hobby was through his father, who recently passed away. While going through some of his father’s belongings, Shawn came across this skid-mounted, water-cooled engine. Owing to the John Deere radiator, Shawn originally thought it was a John Deere unit, but then noticed “Hercules” on the exhaust manifold, leading to us. The engine really has no connection to the old engine hobby, as we generally consider it. Made by Hercules Motor Corp. in Canton, Ohio, it’s a simple 6-cylinder flathead of a type made by the thousands for industrial applications. A tag on the engine identifies it as a Model OXD3, Engine No. 794120. We can only guess at the setup’s intended use (note the belt-driven hydraulic pump on the left side of the engine and the belt pulley on the end of the crankshaft), but perhaps a reader knows?


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Help Identify This Ice Cutting Machine

ice cutting machine 

I have enclosed an interesting photo of an early ice cutting machine. It has a 4-cylinder engine that powered the unit. I have never seen one like it. It does not have a valve cover on the engine.

David Kolzow
615 E. Union St.
Earlville, IL 60518
Sleepyhollow5@frontier.com


It appears to have a cross-flow cylinder head, which was somewhat uncommon in early multi-cylinder engines. Can any readers identify it?

Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Help Herstmonceux Museum Identify a Generator Engine

generator engine 

We recently received a query from Terry Valeriano at the Herstmonceux Museum in Herstmonceux, East Sussex, England, about an engine that is believed to have been located there more than 100 years ago. Although the engine is long gone, for historical purposes the museum is eager to identify the maker. “We found this photo in a publication about The Eastbourne Aviation Co., where the same engineer – Charles de Roemer – installed the identical machine in Eastbourne to build planes for the Navy in 1911,” Terry writes. “We know the engine was mated to a Crompton DC generator providing 110/220 volts. The flywheel detail (holes in the rim) looks a bit like an Anson.” If anyone has any clues, please contact Terry at the museum, and let us know as well.

Terry Valeriano
Herstmonceux Museum
conservation@miss-ocean.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Who Made This Marine Engine?

marine engine

marine engine

marine engine

I would appreciate any suggestions readers may have about the possible manufacturer of this 2-cylinder, 2-cycle marine engine that I have loosely reassembled for purposes of identification. Family recollection has it that it was used to power a commuter launch in the early decades of the last century in one of the Kawartha Lakes to the north of Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. Thus, the date of manufacture could be any time from the late years of the 19th century to, say, the 1920s. Some years ago I rescued it from the bottom of the lake, where it was used as a boat mooring long after the original launch had been decommissioned.

The engine contained no maker’s plate or other identifying features. There was no evidence of original paint if, indeed, it had any – the assertive “Caterpillar” yellow is my doing. Almost everything else you see in the photos, except the piping and the timer, is original.

It may be that I need look no further than Peterborough for the manufacturer, since recent research shows that as of 1910 there were foundries and machine shops in this small town that either produced or carried a line of gas engines. Unfortunately, there were no photos in the ads that I have found to date.

Eric Jackson
friar.jackson@hotmail.com 


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Getting a Bessemer Gas Engine to Original Specs

Bessemer gas engine

Reader Bill Gingerich writes in about a Bessemer he recently bought. He didn’t send a photo, but did supply the following information from the engine’s tag, which reads: The Bessemer Gas Engine Co., Grove City, PA, Gaso Kero Type, No. A626 R.P.M.650 H.P.2. “I bought this engine in pails,” Bill writes, noting the fuel and cooling tank were missing. Specifically, Bill says he’s looking for information to help him get the engine back to original specs; whether that means making parts or buying them. He notes that he has a reprint book, but that it’s not clear. “I don’t have a computer or Internet, but you may leave a message; I will call.”

Bill Gingerich
24491 Cemetery Rd.
Spartansburg, PA 16434
(814) 654-7254

Bill’s Bessemer is a Gaso-Kero, a water-cooled, throttle-governed 2-stroke vertical of the type made by Bessemer Gas Engine Co. between 1913-1925. The image at right is from a Bessemer catalog. Gaso-Kero engines were available in 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hp sizes, and were known for being significantly lighter than their 4-stroke counterparts, making them, ostensibly, easier to move and set up for various farm chores. Although they appear to have had a fairly long production life, survivors are rare. If any readers have a Gaso-Kero Bessemer, we encourage you to send photos of your engine so we can share them.


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com