OLE CASEY

R. C. Case Tractor

Content Tools

Route 1, Box 332, Adena, Ohio 43901

In the fall of 1983, my Dad got a call from a lady near Mt. Pleasant, Ohio who said that she had an old R. C. Case that she wanted to sell which was in pretty bad shape. Pap told her that he did not have room for any more tractors but then he made the mistake of telling me about the phone call. I had been under the impression ever since we started to buy and restore tractors that there is always room for one more!

To make the story short, I went to see 'Ole Casey'. The head was off, the manifold was on the ground, the tires were flat, a four foot tree was growing in the front of the right rear wheel and the pistons, rods, and fan assemble were in the lady's basement. The hood was rusted so badly that a guess was the only way to tell the shape. One fender was missing, bracket and all, and to tell the truth, it was a 'basket case'. Pap exclaimed that he wouldn't take it home. Well a challenge had formed. A price of $30.00 was reached and we set a date to go after it.

After freeing up the brakes and cutting out the tree, we were able to move 'Ole Casey' with the aid of our 4x4 Chevrolet pickup where we could back the trailer up to it. After hauling it home, we had a lot of things to do to get ready for the Stum town show so we pumped up the tires and parked it for a winter job.

About Thanksgiving we got 'Ole Casey' in the shop and got started. There was so much rust that only one or two places showed that the original color was gray. Our first project was to see if the engine could be fixed. We removed two coal buckets of leaves, ground squirrel cuttings, snake skins, mouse nests and etc. from the crank-case and clutch housing. Since everything was in such bad shape, we decided to replace only one set of rings on one piston until we knew if it would ever run again. Three of the rods were original babbitt and one rod which had been broken and the busted piston was replaced with an insert rod used on the 1936 R. C. Case tractor. I have been told that 1935 was the last year for babbitt and also the grey and red color scheme: The casting on the housing reads August 4, 1935.

After assembling and filling up with oil and replacing the missing carb with a John Deere L.A. carb we attempted to start 'Ole Casey'. To our surprise the magneto was very much alive and it easily started and sounded fairly good with good oil pressure. We then removed rust with a chipping gun and replaced the hood with a new one rolled in a metal working shop and built new fenders and bracket. Then 'Old Casey' received a new red & grey paint job.

We have shown it at a couple of shows this fall and I must say it looks great compared to a year ago. In the future, 'Ole Casey' will have to have the remaining three pistons installed with new rings. Pap now thinks alot of 'Ole Casey' and it has a permanent stall in the machinery shed! I wish we had taken a before and after picture of 'Ole Casey'.