MY FIRST TRACTOR

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102 Britannia St., Stratford, Ontario, Canada.

I suppose there are others who attend steam shows to see equipment they remember from by-gone years and to see models they have read about but did not happen to have been used in their locality.

The first tractor I remember was a Hart-Parr Model 30. This tractor was purchased in 1920 along with a John Goodison 28-42 Thresher with a Ruth feeder. It belonged to J. E. Schneider who did our threshing and a number of others in the neighborhood. This tractor preceded the 18-36 model. The general construction was the same as most readers will be familiar with the 2 cylinder 18-36 model, I will list the features that are different from the 18-36 model.

Wheels were of the round spoke type, steering sector and worm on front axle and right front spindle. Steering wheel connected to worm by three rods and two universal joints. Water pump located on fan shaft between fan and friction drive pulley. Clutch was of the external contracting band type on a drum located in the center of the flywheel. Gear shifting lever and quadrant located on an angle frame member between the transmission case and the clutch lever. Bull gears and pinions not enclosed and bull gears were of the annular type.

This tractor had a canopy. Whether this was original equipment, an optional extra, or built on by the owner, I am at a loss to know. The bore and stroke was 6/2' x 7'. The construction of these tractors is quite similar to the Waterloo Boy. I wonder if any of the readers know if there is any connection here.

The 1971 Steam Show at Brigden, Ontario had a Hart-Parr Model 30 on display. This tractor, while not a restored to show room condition machine, was still being used for farm work and was in remarkably good shape. They announced it as being built in 1917. It differed from the one I had seen by two features. The water pump was located on top of the crankcase driven by the magneto and governor shaft. The gear shifter lever was located on top of the transmission case. These two features were the same as the 18-36 model and would lead one to believe this to be a newer model than the 1920 one I had seen.

While attending George Hedtke's Show at Kings, Illinois in 1969, he had on display a John Goodison thresher with Ruth feeder. This was a 22'-36' machine but was identical to the one I remember from the 1920s.

Until I started reading the Gas Engine Magazine, I did not know that Hart-Parr made an oil-cooled tractor. I would like to attend a show that featured one of these, but so far I have not been able to find out which show has one.