AS I SAW IT CHAPTER 31

I.H.C. 1910, 15 HP one cylinder Type A'

I.H.C. 1910, 15 HP one cylinder Type A.

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Maxwell, Route 4, Huntington, Indiana 46750

As I sit here writing this November 11, 1976, I well remember that date in 1918. We were painting a new corn crib that was just finished and we heard whistles and church bells ringing in the city four miles away. Our mother came out and said the Armistice had been signed and World War I was over. The press made a big issue that this war ended all wars and would make the world safe for democracy forever. Well it didn't, because there has been continuous war some place in the world ever since.

Up to 1905 The International Harvester had not yet made a tractor. The Ohio Tractor of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, was making a chassis, frame and wheels for sale. Anyone could mount an engine on it and have a tractor. In 1906 I.H.C. got them to build a tractor using their Famous gasoline engine for power. They were made in 10, 12, and 15 HP sizes. These were hit and miss engines, friction driven. In 1907 they made the Type A gear driven 15 HP. In 1909 a few of Type B 20 HP using a throttling In 1909 at Winnipeg a type A 15 HP and a type B 20 HP were given Gold Medals and Sweepstakes.

governor gear driven engine, also a few Type C in 20 HP with a friction reverse.

International all One Cylinder

10 HP

1906 to 1908

Type A gear driven 12 and 15 HP Type B throttling governor

12 HP

1906 to 1909

Type C Gear driven. Friction reverse.

20 HP

1907 to 1908

8-3/4 x 15'

Mogul

20 HP

1910 to 1914

 8-3/4 x 15'

25 HP

1910 to 1914

 10 x 15

Titan

20 HP

1910 to 1914

 8-3/4 x 15

25 HP

1910 to 1914

 10 x 15

By today's standards these tractors would be crude, but in their way they were something. In the 1912 American Thresherman for January was given the details of a 20 HP I.H.C. tractor using gasoline pulling a six bottom 14' Oliver plow, on the James Oliver farm at South Bend, Indiana. Engine was a 8? x 15' bore and stroke. These engines had big heavy flywheels and when they got rolling there was power. Now the 20 and 25 HP either Mogul or Titan had good sales and can be found yet in collections in the northwest and Canada. While the ground speed was slow, they were good in the belt. The following are sizes of Moguls and Titans and the year built:

Mogul

20 HP

1910 to 1914

 8-3/4 x 15'

25 HP

1910 to 1914

 10 x 15'

Titan

20 HP

1910 to 1914

 8-3/4 x 15'

25 HP

1910 to 1914

 10 x 15'

Now in 1908 I.H.C. bought out the Ohio Tractor plant and moved it to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where the Titans were to be built and part to a new tractor plant being built in Chicago where the Moguls were to be made. The new tractor plant was built in 1910 and production started in 1911. Now you will note the Titans and Moguls were built at the same time, the Titans in Milwaukee and Moguls in Chicago. The Titan was the Deering and the Mogul the McCormick line. Both very similar, depending upon which factory made them. Both models were sold by the same dealer.

The first tractor I ever saw was in 1910. A man had bought a 160 acre farm across the road from our home. It was all in pasture and be hired a man north of town to custom plow it. He had just bought a new 20 HP one cylinder Mogul and a four bottom hand lift plow to do the job. I can remember very well seeing and hearing that tractor come across the field. People came from miles in horse and buggy to see their first tractor work. Most of their comments were not favorable to the tractor. No one could conceive that the average farmer would ever own one, etc.