What Is That Crazy Connecticut Yankee Doing Now?

Or, What Can You Do With A Backhoe When The Ground Is Frozen?

Splitting Log

Splitting log.

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146 Shear Shop Road, Litchfield, Connecticut 06759

A few years ago I wrote about the welder I made from my 9N tractor and a B-17 generator. A few of you wrote wanting directions to make one. I wonder how you made out?

For you younger folks: the B-17 was the workhorse for our Air Force during the second World War. I'd like to ask you: From whom did the Russians and Americans learn about rockets and jets?

I always wanted to have a log splitter but did not want to spend $2,500 to buy one (we didn't have the money), but one day I stood looking at my 1948 8N Ford with the old Henry backhoe on it.

The backhoe has the necessary hydraulics. At first I was going to buy a cylinder, but decided to try the cylinder from the crowd on the backhoe. I purchased a 5 x 5 square tube and the wedge and attachment iron. Used several what-are-you-dragging-that-around-for items such as a bed frame for the stand, an old PTO shaft and spare stake for the horseshoe pit for an axle, and off we went. Works great!

It is always interesting to me how many people become involved in a simple project like this.

Bill Hubert harvested wood that left me slash. Seph, my son, and his friend from nursery school, Major Marcel Schneider, helped pull logs out of the woods. George and Pete of Cesco Steel helped with welding supplies, Torrington Scrap with the steel. Cheryl, Ron, George, Russ, Allen, Bob at Grunders Tractors helped with tractor supplies. John claimed he'd taken his wife fishing. Northern Hydraulics the wedge. You can see I'm enjoying retirement!.