Hercules Engine News

Charting the Course of Carts

1- HP Economy engine

Illustration #1: Wooden cart for Sparta-built 1- HP Economy engine.

Content Tools

Questions frequently come up regarding the proper cart for 1- HP and 1- HP Hercules and Economy engines. In reviewing Sears & Roebuck catalogs and Hercules catalogs, it would appear that both brands used the same cart during the same time periods.

I would like to back-track from the 1914 start of Hercules production for Sears and start with the cart that was offered by Sears for the 1 HP and 1- HP Economy engines built at Sparta, Mich., in 1913. The cart is illustrated here and the dimensions are as follows: Wooden beam size is 2- by 2- by 36 inches. Five spoke cast iron wheels are 10x2 inches in front and 12 x 2 inches at rear. (Illustration #1)

In 1914 the cart listed by Sears & Roebuck had a 40-inch angle iron frame, 24-inch wide axles with five spoke cast iron 10- x 2-inch front wheels and 12- x 2-inch rear wheels. This cart would have been used for the Model D and the early Model E engines with the tag on the base. (Illustration #2)

In 1915 and 1916 the cart listed had a 44-inch angle iron frame, 24-inch wide axles with six spoke cast iron 9- x 2-inch wheels front and rear. This cart allowed the front wheels to be turned under the cart. (Illustration #3)

For the years 1917-1919, the cart listed had a 33-inch angle iron frame, 24-inch wide axles and six spoke cast iron 9- x 2-inch wheels front and rear. The front wheels would turn under the cart frame.

From 1920 through early 1928, the cart listed had a 26-inch long angle iron frame, 18-inch wide axles and six spoke cast iron 9- x 2-inch wheels front and rear. The front wheels would not turn under the cart frame. (Illustration #4)

Starting in late 1928 and through 1929 the cart no longer had a frame, and the axle bolsters bolted directly to the engine base. The bolsters were 15 inches wide and the six spoke cast iron wheels were 8 x 1- inches.

For 1930-1932 the dimensions stayed the same, but the cast iron wheels now had six round holes rather than six spokes, as before. After 1932 the wheel kit was no longer offered. (Illustration #5)

Finally, some time ago I made mention of a small clutch pulley mounted on a 1- HP Economy engine. Here is an illustration and description of that pulley from a Sears catalog.

Glenn Karch is a noted authority on Hercules engines. Contact him at: 20601 Old State Rd., Haubstadt, IN 47639, or e-mail at: glenn.karch@gte.net